O'Reilly logo

Brand Bible by Debbie Millman

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

(RAY)
F39 Job:09-26878 Title:RP-Brand Bible
10-C65031 #175 Dtp:204 Page:260
001-297_C65031.indd 260
10/24/11 7:24 PM
BRAND BIBLE260
(Text)



We provide the insights and inspiration so that we
and our clients can understand everything that a
brand is in its current state and everything that it
can become through design. We seek to understand
the role that design plays in the relationship that a
consumer has with a brand today and in the future.
Design Intelligence helps set the course for design,
but our process is not purely analytical. Its equally
inuenced by consumer insights and our own power
to imagine. Our process would be entirely ineectual
if it involved a bunch of strategists sitting in a room
25
How to Brand
a Beverage

Mike Bainbridge
Executive Vice
President,
Sterling Brands
Finding the essential
in packaging for
Tropicana
(RAY)
F39 Job:09-26878 Title:RP-Brand Bible
10-C65031 #175 Dtp:204 Page:260
001-297_C65031.indd 260
10/24/11 7:25 PM
F39 Job:09-26878 Title:RP-Brand Bible
#175 Dtp:204 Page:261
(RAY)
001-320_26878.indd 261 10/7/11 1:11 PM
(Text)

Tropic-Ana, an early
Tropicana character
coming up with ideas and then hoping a designer
could interpret them. When those two sides work
to weave together imagination and design from the
outset, we get something truly special.



At one time, Tropicana was the orange juice industry
leader. They had essentially created the not-from-
concentrate category, and they owned that space
as the premium brand for many years. Over time,
several other brands became competitive, and Tropi-
cana was no longer the only not-from-concentrate
option on the shelf. We were asked to help the brand
reclaim the superiority of its agship product: Pure
Premium orange juice. Tropicana needed to reassert
itself as the industry leader.

The project of “reclaiming superiority” presents
the problem in very theoretical terms. That charge,
alone, is not inspirational enough or directional
enough to be solved through design. The rst task
of Design Intelligence was to distill that somewhat
vague notion into something that could be addressed
through design.
We spent the rst few weeks identifying problems
and suggesting themes that could be used for poten-
tial solutions. We then developed some concepts
that focused on the feel of the brand. One theme
was centered [on] the idea that drinking orange
juice in the morning is a very grounding and peace-
ful moment—but the outcome is very energizing.
Another concept was structured as a celebration of
the products “goodness.”
This project allowed us to do some early research to
nd out from consumers where Tropicana’s brand
equity lies today, and where it could be taken in
the future. Quantitative research ndings told the
Tropicana leadership that the brands name recogni-
tion was extremely solid. We also learned that though
consumers’ anity for the product was strong, it
showed signs of erosion. Its important to remember
that if brands aren’t communicating their message,
they’re positioned in the market either by what other
people say or by what the brands don’t say. Even
though Tropicana’s leadership believed wholeheart-
edly that their product was better than any other, it
became apparent that they hadn’t devoted the time
and resources to remind consumers of that.
We conducted qualitative research—which has its
pitfalls—to nd out what aspects of the brand reso-
nated most strongly with consumers. Through a rst
phase of research, we found that the brand’s straw-
in-orange icon had a strong resonance in consumers
minds, even if they didn’t identify it with Tropicana.
But when consumers were asked to connect symbols
with specic brands, we found that the straw-in-or-
ange icon was very much associated with Tropicana.
In fact, that symbol was the essence of Tropicana: a
premium product that tasted exactly like what juicy
oranges should taste like. It was very apparent that
this was the quintessential visual representation of
the Tropicana brand.

We learned that Tropicana had two major problems.
First, it was impossible for the brand to claim supe-
riority when it looked like everyone else. And second,
it had become increasingly dicult to distinguish its
product in stores.
261
F39 Job:09-26878 Title:RP-Brand Bible
#175 Dtp:204 Page:261
(RAY)
001-320_26878.indd 261
10/7/11 10:09 AM
F39 Job:09-26878 Title:RP-Brand Bible
#175 Dtp:204 Page:262
(RAY)
001-320_26878.indd 262 10/7/11 10:32 AM
(Text)
BRAND BIBLE
Tropicana is a
case study of how
to evolve a brand
responsibly.
In these types
of projects, our
fundamental
challenge is to
keep the integ-
rity of the brand
intact, but also
spur its progress
in a way that’s
respectful to
the relationship
with the brands
consumer.
Tropicana’s straw-in-
orange trademark
F39 Job:09-26878 Title:RP-Brand Bible
#175 Dtp:204 Page:262
(RAY)
001-320_26878.indd 262
10/7/11 10:09 AM

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required