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Building Design Portfolios by Sara Eisenman

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Job no:70268 Title : RP- Building Design Portfolios Client : Pro-Vision
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For many design jobs, websites are the first place
an art director will view a designer’s work; the
designer then needs to follow up with a print
portfolio and live presentation. But for website
designers, motion video designers, and product
designers, websites are the best and, sometimes,
only meaningful way to show their work. Online
portfolios, however, aren’t just for tech-heavy
design. They are also a great way to display any
piece that would need to be photographed for
inclusion in a traditional print portfolio—every-
thing from food packaging and outdoor signage
to large three-dimensional objects.
Because websites can be viewed at any time of
the day or night, they can be a particularly effec-
tive way of ensuring that your work gets seen.
Many clients expect successful professional
designers to have a website. It’s a sign that a
designer is established and serious about his or
her work. Websites have also eliminated many
international barriers to business by reducing the
need to send print portfolios between countries.
Many successful design studios redesign their
sites as often as once a year to maintain a good
reputation and stay current. Websites also need
to be updated frequently to show recent work and
give viewers a reason to come back. In general,
firms or individual designers hire a Web designer
or programming specialist to create a site and
work closely with them on the overall concept
and function. It’s important that a website match
the tone and style of the work of the designer or
design firm.
Creating
Interactive
Portfolios and
Websites
/ Building Design Portfolios
Portfolios_046_085_M1 25/1/06 10:18 AM Page 74
Job no:70268 Title : RP- Building Design Portfolios Client : Pro-Vision
Scn :
#
175 Size : 171.45(w)254(h)mm Co : M1 C0 O/P: CTP
Dept : DTP D/O : 26.01.06 (Job no:000000 D/O : 00.00.01 Co: CM0)
p75
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75 / CREATING interactive portfolios and websites75
OPPOSITE
A playful, interactive design by Zarse on this Web page
instructs the viewer to choose paint colors that brighten
spirits, ease tension, or enlarge space.
ABOVE
Nathan Zarse, a student from the Herron School of Art
and Design, displays his interest in 1950s design on his
website. He gives it a period look and theme by using a
palette of pale green and cream and setting the text in
letterspaced sans-serif type.
Portfolios_046_085_M1 25/1/06 07:41 PM Page 75

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