CHAPTER 76

EUROPEAN GRADUATE WORK IN INFORMATION ASSURANCE AND THE BOLOGNA DECLARATION1

Urs E. Gattiker

76.1 UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE EDUCATION

76.2 CONVERGENCE OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

76.3 BACHELOR'S AND MASTER'S IN INFORMATION SECURITY

76.4 COMPUTER SCIENCE: DOES IT ENCOMPASS INFORMATION SECURITY, ASSURANCE, AND SECURITY ASSURANCE?

76.5 BOLOGNA BACHELOR'S DEGREE

76.6 MOVING FROM UNDERGRADUATE TO GRADUATE EDUCATION: BOLOGNA

76.7 EXECUTIVE AND SPECIALIZED MASTER'S DEGREES

76.8 SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES: ARTS AND SCIENCE

76.9 WHAT DO PROGRAMS IN INFORMATION SECURITY TEACH STUDENTS?

76.10 UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION: POLYTECHNICS AND UNIVERSITY

76.11 INFORMATION ASSURANCE: DEFINING THE TERRITORY

76.12 TEACHING INFORMATION SECURITY: THE MALWARE EXAMPLE

76.13 CONCLUSION OF EUROPEAN INITIATIVES OVERVIEW

76.14 IMPLICATIONS FOR EDUCATION

76.15 IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGERS

76.16 NOTES

A fundamental fact in computer, information, and network security2 is the impossibility of 100 percent assurance that a computer system is trusted.3 How education can help in achieving the required level of trust considering various stakeholders (e.g., society, consumers, shareholders, and suppliers) is open to discussion. Some have suggested that certification is the answer; others support the notion that information assurance programs can fill the gap. In the latter case, advocates also hope that such programs will provide nations with the professionals required to reduce risks of possible disasters while ...

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