O'Reilly logo

Creating Comics! by Paul Gulacy, Spencer Drate, Judith Salavetz

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Job:05-19413 Title:Creating Comics
#175 P DTP:204 Page:124
(RAY)
120-176_19413.indd 124 5/26/10 8:57:58 AM
(Text)
Next page:
Title: Escalator ad, 2005
Client: Chicago Tribune
Creative Process
I follow the same basic approach with my print work that I do
when producing animated projects. I analyze the concept and
choose or create a graphic vocabulary to follow. Every style and
technique comes with baggage that the reader/viewer brings
with him or her—this is especially important to keep in mind when
doing a parody/satire piece.
I illustrated an interview with Kirsten Dunst for Esquire that
coincided with the release of the first Spider-Man. I chose to not
only use the paneled comic book layout to tell the story (a relative
no-brainer under the circumstances), but also decided to make
a transition over the course of the interview/story from the bland
illustration style I’m known for using in my Saturday Night Live
animation, into a full-blown 1960s Spider-Man comic book style.
This accentuated the documentary feel of Dunst being
interviewed, while not only reminding the reader of her role in
the movie, but also weaving a thread throughout the piece that
reflects the transition of Spider-Man’s alter ego Peter Parker into
the troubled web-slinger. The reason Esquire wanted me to do the
piece in the first place was to take a relatively mundane interview
and make it entertaining. I felt that the approach I developed ad-
dressed their desire and more!
I like to tease viewers. I’ve learned by doing thirty-second TV
commercials that you can easily lose your audience if you don’t
keep them interested or—even better—intrigued by what you’re
doing. Teasing and tantalizing works well to keep people locked
in to your efforts. Sometimes it’s as simple as a nice design or
drawing, but often I add subtexts and subtle details that take
repeat viewings to catch.
J.
J. and Patrice Sedelmaier formed J.J. Sedelmaier
Productions, Inc., in White Plains, New York, in
1990. The studio produces animation, print, and
corporate branding, and assists as a reference
resource for various historical research projects.
Although known for its cutting-edge animated TV com-
mercials for clients such as 7 Up, Volkswagen, Slim Jim,
and Hotwire, the studio is also responsible for launch-
ing Beavis and Butthead with MTV, creating the hilarious
cartoons for Saturday Night Live with Robert Smigel, and
developing the pilot episode of Harvey Birdman, Attorney
at Law for Cartoon Network. Illustration and design work
has been produced for Playboy, Esquire, Rolling Stone,
Texas Monthly, and clients such as FootJoy, Converse,
Home Savings Bank, and the Chicago Tribune.
The studio provides creative consultation as well as
gives presentations to corporations and universities, and
has won close to seven hundred film and design awards
from festivals all over the globe.
J.J. Sedelmaier
124
Creating Comics
Job:05-19413 Title:Creating Comics
#175 P DTP:204 Page:124
(RAY)
120-176_19413.indd 124 5/26/10 8:56:40 AM

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required