(Ray)
(Fogra 39)Job:04-30554 Title:RP-Creative Photography Lab
#175 Dtp:225 Page:102
088-105_30554.indd 102 4/26/13 11:11 AM
(Ray)
(Fogra 39)Job:04-30554 Title:RP-Creative Photography Lab
#175 Dtp:225 Page:103
088-105_30554.indd 103 4/26/13 11:11 AM
Talking T o Yourself
CreaT ive PhoT ograPhY lab
102
(Text)
1. Choose either an activity or a person
to cover. The subject should be
something you aren’t already too
familiar with. The photography and
research should go together, and you
are the audience.
2. Make arrangements to access your
subject. If it’s a person, see if you
can shadow them for part of a day.
If your subject is an activity, nd out
schedules and see if you need
permission. You could follow a vet
around for a day or go to a model
airplane show.
3. Shoot in black and white or convert
the image later.
4. Be sure to have plenty of memory-
card space and shoot like crazy.
5. Look for the off-stage moments
between the action shots.
6. Shoot even if you aren’t sure of
exposure or focus.
7. Do a quick edit of your images soon
after you are nished shooting. Then
come back a day later and reevaluate
your selections.
Settings
Black and white are the
colors of photography. To
me they symbolize the
alternatives of hope and
despair to which mankind
is forever subjected.”
—Robert Frank
Is photography fact or ction? How you approach any subject is affected by your opinion, and
therefore the images will have a particular slant. In this lab, imagine you are a reporter and you
have been assigned to cover something or someone with an in-depth essay.
Document
36
LAB
ash off
PAS: A snapshot mode is
best. Use black-and-white if
you have it.
DSLR: Use an auto mode that
allows you to move fast and
shoot in lower light situations.
Give up depth of eld for
stop action.
smartphone: Shoot multiple
shots of each scene and edit
out the best shots later.
These images are from a project documenting people in rural villages in Nicaragua.
Let’s Go!
(Ray)
(Fogra 39)Job:04-30554 Title:RP-Creative Photography Lab
#175 Dtp:225 Page:102
088-105_30554.indd 102 4/26/13 11:10 AM
Talking T o Yourself
103
(Text)
Creative PhotograP hy Lab
1. Choose either an activity or a person
to cover. The subject should be
something you aren’t already too
familiar with. The photography and
research should go together, and you
are the audience.
2. Make arrangements to access your
subject. If it’s a person, see if you
can shadow them for part of a day.
If your subject is an activity, nd out
schedules and see if you need
permission. You could follow a vet
around for a day or go to a model
airplane show.
3. Shoot in black and white or convert
the image later.
4. Be sure to have plenty of memory-
card space and shoot like crazy.
5. Look for the off-stage moments
between the action shots.
6. Shoot even if you aren’t sure of
exposure or focus.
7. Do a quick edit of your images soon
after you are nished shooting. Then
come back a day later and reevaluate
your selections.
The more time I spent with the people, the more intimate and fun the images became.
Is photography fact or ction? How you approach any subject is affected by your opinion, and
therefore the images will have a particular slant. In this lab, imagine you are a reporter and you
have been assigned to cover something or someone with an in-depth essay.
Document
Let’s Go!
(Ray)
(Fogra 39)Job:04-30554 Title:RP-Creative Photography Lab
#175 Dtp:225 Page:103
088-105_30554.indd 103 4/26/13 11:10 AM

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