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Database Archiving

Book Description

With the amount of data a business accumulates now doubling every 12 to 18 months, IT professionals need to know how to develop a system for archiving important database data, in a way that both satisfies regulatory requirements and is durable and secure. This important and timely new book explains how to solve these challenges without compromising the operation of current systems. It shows how to do all this as part of a standardized archival process that requires modest contributions from team members throughout an organization, rather than the superhuman effort of a dedicated team.

* Exhaustively considers the diverse set of issues—legal, technological, and financial—affecting organizations faced with major database archiving requirements.

* Shows how to design and implement a database archival process that is integral to existing procedures and systems.

* Explores the role of players at every level of the organization—in terms of the skills they need and the contributions they can make.

* Presents its ideas from a vendor-neutral perspective that can benefit any organization, regardless of its current technological investments.

* Provides detailed information on building the business case for all types of archiving projects

Table of Contents

  1. Brief Table of Contents
  2. Table of Contents
  3. Copyright
  4. Dedication
  5. Preface
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. Part 1. Archiving Basics
    1. Chapter 1. Database Archiving Overview
      1. 1.1. A Definition of Database Archiving
      2. 1.2. Forms of Data Archiving
      3. 1.3. The Data Lifeline
      4. 1.4. Types of Data Objects
      5. 1.5. Data Retention Requirements Versus Data Archives
      6. 1.6. The Database Archives and Other Database Types
      7. Summary
    2. Chapter 2. The Business Case for Database Archiving
      1. 2.1. Why Database Archiving is a Problem Today
      2. 2.2. Implications of not Keeping Data
      3. 2.3. Data Volume Issues
      4. 2.4. Change Management
      5. 2.5. Current Database Archiving Practices
      6. Summary
    3. Chapter 3. Generic Archiving Methodology
      1. 3.1. The Methodology
      2. 3.2. Define Motivation for Archiving
      3. 3.3. Identify Objects to Archive
      4. 3.4. Determine When to Put Objects in the Archive
      5. 3.5. Determine How Long to Keep Objects in the Archive
      6. 3.6. Determine What to do with Discarded Objects
      7. 3.7. Determine Who Needs Access to Archives and How
      8. 3.8. Determine the Form of Archive Objects
      9. 3.9. Determine Where the Archive will be Kept
      10. 3.10. Determine Operational Processes Needed
      11. 3.11. Determine Necessary Administrative Processes
      12. 3.12. Determine Required Change Processes
      13. Summary
    4. Chapter 4. Components of a Database Archiving System
      1. 4.1. The Database Archiving Organization
      2. 4.2. Archive Application Data Gathering
      3. 4.3. Archive Application Design
      4. 4.4. Archive Data Extraction
      5. 4.5. Archive Data Management
      6. 4.6. Archive Access
      7. 4.7. Archive Administration
      8. Summary
  8. Part 2. Establishing a Database Archiving Project
    1. Chapter 5. Origins of a Database Archiving Application
      1. An archiving organization
      2. 5.1. Problems that Lead to Database Archiving Solutions
      3. 5.2. Recognizing Problems
      4. 5.3. Assignment of Problems for Initial Study
      5. 5.4. Initial Problem Study Components
      6. 5.5. Determining the Basic Strategy for the Archiving Application
      7. 5.6. The Application Strategy Chart
      8. Summary
    2. Chapter 6. Resources Needed
      1. 6.1. People
      2. 6.2. Authority
      3. 6.3. Education
      4. 6.4. Repository
      5. 6.5. Archive Server
      6. 6.6. Software Tools
      7. 6.7. Disk Storage
      8. Summary
    3. Chapter 7. Locating Data
      1. 7.1. Inventorying Data
      2. 7.2. Picking the Archivist's Data
      3. 7.3. Documenting Data Sources
      4. Summary
    4. Chapter 8. Locating Metadata
      1. 8.1. Metadata Definitions
      2. 8.2. Where to Find Metadata
      3. 8.3. Selecting a Version of the Metadata
      4. 8.4. Classifying Data
      5. 8.5. Documenting Metadata
      6. 8.6. Keeping Up with Changes
      7. Summary
    5. Chapter 9. Data and Metadata Validation
      1. 9.1. Matching Data to Metadata
      2. 9.2. Assessing Data Quality
      3. 9.3. Assessing Metadata Quality
      4. 9.4. Validating Data Classification
      5. 9.5. Documenting Validation Activities
      6. 9.6. Repeating Validation Activities
      7. Summary
  9. Part 3. Designing Database Archiving Applications
    1. Chapter 10. Designing for Archive Independence
      1. 10.1. Independence from Application Programs
      2. 10.2. Independence from DBMS
      3. 10.3. Independence from Systems
      4. 10.4. Independence from Data Formats
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 11. Modeling Archive Data
      1. 11.1. The Source Data Model
      2. 11.2. The Target Data Model
      3. 11.3. Model Representations
      4. Summary
    3. Chapter 12. Setting Archive Policies
      1. 12.1. Extract Policies
      2. 12.2. Archive Storage Policies
      3. 12.3. Archive Discard Policies
      4. 12.4. Validation and Approval
      5. Summary
    4. Chapter 13. Changes to Data Structures and Policies
      1. 13.1. Archiving System Strategies for Handling Metadata Changes
      2. 13.2. Metadata Change Categories
      3. 13.3. Changes to the Archive Data Model
      4. 13.4. Managing the Metadata Change Process
      5. 13.5. Changes to Archive Policies
      6. 13.6. Maintaining an Audit Trail of Changes
      7. Summary
  10. Part 4. Database Archiving Application Software
    1. Chapter 14. The Archive Data Store
      1. 14.1. Archive Database Choices
      2. 14.2. Important Features
      3. 14.3. False Features
      4. 14.4. How Choices Stack Up
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 15. The Archive Data Extraction Component
      1. 15.1. The Archive Extractor Model
      2. 15.2. Extractor Implementation Approaches
      3. 15.3. Execution Options
      4. 15.4. Integrity Considerations
      5. 15.5. Other Considerations
      6. Summary
    3. Chapter 16. The Archive Discard Component
      1. 16.1. Data Structure Considerations
      2. 16.2. Implementation Form
      3. 16.3. Integrity Considerations
      4. 16.4. Operational Considerations
      5. 16.5. Audit Trail
      6. Summary
    4. Chapter 17. The Archive Access Component
      1. 17.1. Direct Programming Access
      2. 17.2. Access Through Generic Query and Search Tools
      3. 17.3. Access Through Report Generators and BI Tools
      4. 17.4. Selective Data Unload
      5. 17.5. Accessing Original Data
      6. 17.6. Metadata Services
      7. 17.7. Other Access Considerations
      8. Summary
  11. Part 5. Administration of the Database Archive
    1. Chapter 18. Ongoing Auditing and Testing
      1. 18.1. Responsibility for Ongoing Auditing and Testing
      2. 18.2. Auditing Activities
      3. 18.3. Testing Activities
      4. 18.4. Frequency of Audits and Tests
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 19. Managing the Archive Over Time
      1. 19.1. Managing the Archive Database
      2. 19.2. Managing the Archive Repository
      3. 19.3. Using Hosted Solutions
      4. 19.4. Managing Archive Users
      5. Summary
    3. Chapter 20. Nonoperational Sources of Data
      1. 20.1. Retired Applications
      2. 20.2. Data from Mergers and Acquisitions
      3. 20.3. e-Discovery Applications
      4. 20.4. Business Intelligence Data
      5. 20.5. Logs, Audit Trails, and other Miscellaneous Stuff
      6. Summary
  12. Appendix Final Thoughts
  13. Appendix A. Generic Archiving Checklist
  14. Appendix B. Goals of a Database Archiving System
  15. Appendix C. Job Description of a Database Archive Analyst
    1. Position
    2. Job Responsibilities
    3. Required Qualifications
    4. Other Helpful Qualifications and Characteristics
  16. Glossary
  17. Glossary
  18. Bibliography
    1. References
  19. Index
    1. A
    2. B
    3. C
    4. D
    5. E
    6. F
    7. G
    8. H
    9. I
    10. J
    11. K
    12. L
    13. M
    14. N
    15. O
    16. P
    17. Q
    18. R
    19. S
    20. T
    21. U
    22. V
    23. W
    24. X
    25. Y