26 DB2 II: Performance Monitoring, Tuning and Capacity Planning Guide
1.5 DB2 Information Integrator topology considerations
Organizations choose Information Technology (IT) platforms and topologies
based on their application characteristics, scalability, and availability
requirements. For example, for an online stock trading Web application, an
organization might choose the AIX platform for the WebSphere Application
Server (WAS) and implement both vertical and horizontal WAS clones to achieve
the desired scalability and availability requirements of the application.
The key decisions to be made for a DB2 II implementation are:
򐂰 What platform to choose: UNIX, Windows, or Linux?
򐂰 Dedicated federated server or variations of collocation with data sources?
򐂰 What are the capacity requirements of DB2 II?
In this section, we briefly describe the basic topologies and discuss the key
criteria involved in choosing between them.
Figure 1-6 on page 27 shows the two basic topologies involved, as follows:
򐂰 The dedicated federated server has no data sources in the same machine as
the federated server whatsoever.
򐂰 There are two variations of the collocated federated server, as shown in
Figure 1-6 on page 27:
The DB2 data source is enabled to be the federated server. There may or
may not be other DB2 and non-DB2 relational data sources on the same
machine. The machine may also house non-relational data that may be
referenced in one or more federated queries.
The federated server is in a separate DB2 instance/database on a
machine that has DB2 or non-DB2 relational data sources sharing the
machine. The machine may also house non-relational data that may be
referenced in one or more federated queries.
In general, the DB2 data source enabled to be the federated server option
performs better than the option where the federated server has its own DB2
instance/database, especially when the database is partitioned (DPF).
However, the federated server in its own DB2 instance/database provides
better fault tolerance and isolation.
Chapter 1. DB2 Information Integrator architecture overview 27
Figure 1-6 DB2 II topologies
The key criteria in choosing a particular DB2 II topology are scalability,
availability, total cost of ownership, performance and access considerations.
Attention: The choice of a particular platform (UNIX, Windows or Linux) is
largely driven by scalability, availability, and total cost of ownership
considerations, and will not be discussed here.
Estimating the CPU and memory capacity requirements of a federated server
for a new application is also beyond the scope of this book. However, for
organizations that currently have DB2 II installed, Chapter 5, “Capacity
planning in an existing DB2 II environment” on page 377, documents a
procedure for developing custom query utilization profiles that may be used to
estimate the capacity requirements of new applications on the same or
different federated server.
UNIX, Windows, or Linux
Local
Non-relaional
data
COLLOCATED
Federated Server
sharing same DB2 database
as the DB2 data source
DB2 Information Integrator
Federated
Server
Non-relational
Data Sources
Relational
Data Sources
DEDICATED
Federated Server
Federated
Server
+
DB2 data
source
UNIX, Windows, or Linux
DB2 Information Integrator
Non-relational
Data Sources
Relational
Data Sources
UNIX, Windows, or Linux
Local
Non-relaional
data
COLLOCATED
Federated Server
in a different DB2 instance/database
than the DB2 (or non-DB2) data sources
DB2 Information Integrator
Non-relational
Data Sources
Relational
Data Sources
Federated
Server
DB2 or
non-DB2
data sources
DB2 or
non-DB2
data sources

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