Job no: 08-97814 Title: RP: Design Matters: Brochures
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PLANNING DESIGN BASICS BUDGET CONSIDERATIONS PRACTICAL MATTERS
Getting it Printed
To get from a design on your computer to a beautiful printed piece, you have to
navigate a number of crucial steps and avoid countless pitfalls along the way.
Whether it’s a color that's off or a special effect gone wrong, there’s nothing
worse than having a surprise after you’ve printed 20,000 copies. “There are a
million ways for things to go wrong,” says Paul Wharton, vice president, creative,
at Larsen in Minneapolis. As such, it’s key to follow up on every production
detail. Reitmayer couldn’t agree more. “I think you have to babysit it every step of
the way,” she says about print projects. “You have to develop a good relationship
with your printer. Find someone good who you like, and likes you, and learn from
them.” Early in her career, she developed a loyalty to a particular printer and
picked up a great deal of knowledge from the connection.
How can you safeguard against a misstep? Do as much homework as possible
in advance. “A key way to not make mistakes is to sit down with the printer and
show him your design and say, ‘Do you see any problems?’” Wharton says. If you
want to take this a step further, make an actual mock-up of your design using
the paper you want to print it on. This gives you a chance to spot any pitfalls and
creates another communication tool for the production process. “Take it to the
printer and bindery company,” Reitmayer says. “Make sure it’s possible. And see
what it costs.” After talking with the printer, you may be surprised at what you
can and can’t afford. Don’t be afraid to ask questions.
DESIGN MATTERS // BROCHURES 01
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Job no: 08-97814 Title: RP: Design Matters: Brochures
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Job no: 08-97814 Title: RP: Design Matters: Brochures
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PLANNING DESIGN BASICS BUDGET CONSIDERATIONS PRACTICAL MATTERS
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When they’re chosen carefully—and executed well—special processes elevate brochure projects to another level. These
extra touches can help grab people’s attention and keep it, but to do so, they need to be applied judiciously. “Doing
something just for the sake of doing it doesn’t make sense,” Wharton says. “One of the rules of thumb would be, ‘Does the
special process enhance the message?’” Adding a foil stamp to a brochure cover just for decoration, for instance, probably
isn’t such a good idea. But if it communicates the upscale nature of the business, you’re reinforcing a key brand attribute.
It’s also a challenge to make sure your chosen effect turns out the way you imagine. Whether you’re considering
embossing or foil stamping, there are strengths and limitations to each process. You need to know what those are and
plan appropriately. These processes all add weight to the type or artwork—something to keep in mind during the design
process. This is another instance where it pays to work closely with your vendor and learn as much as you can about the
technique in advance of printing. Here’s a closer look at some popular options:
Special Effects
®
This series of brochures promotes Wausau
Paper’s capabilities as applied to fi ve different
business segments: hospitality, industrial,
banking, public institutions, and retail. Each
folder focuses on a different special process
and includes sample projects—such as a
business card, invitation, and brochure—
tucked in the front. Larsen in Minneapolis
designed this project.
FOIL STAMPING
When they started working on a
promotional brochure for RSVP
Soirée, a catering and event rental
company, the design team at
Rovillo + Reitmayer knew they had
to send a distinctive message. The
client’s target audience was an
upscale, exclusive crowd, so the piece
needed to feel high-end. So how
did they grab attention? In part, it
was with a gold foil stamp displayed
prominently on the cover. This shiny
effect contrasts with the uncoated
brown cover stock to create a bold
contrast. “It’s something people want
to touch and feel,” Reitmayer says. “It
makes it a little harder to throw away.
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DESIGN MATTERS // BROCHURES 01
Job no: 08-97814 Title: RP: Design Matters: Brochures
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