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Design Sprint

Book Description

With more than 500 new apps entering the market every day, what does it take to build a successful digital product? You can greatly reduce your risk of failure with design sprints, a process that enables your team to prototype and test a digital product idea within a week. This practical guide shows you exactly what a design sprint involves and how you can incorporate the process into your organization.

Design sprints not only let you test digital product ideas before you pour too many resources into a project, they also help everyone get on board—whether they’re team members, decision makers, or potential users. You’ll know within days whether a particular product idea is worth pursuing.

Design sprints enable you to:

  • Clarify the problem at hand, and identify the needs of potential users
  • Explore solutions through brainstorming and sketching exercises
  • Distill your ideas into one or two solutions that you can test
  • Prototype your solution and bring it to life
  • Test the prototype with people who would use it

Table of Contents

  1.  
  2. Foreword
    1. Why Care About Design Sprints?
  3. This book is for you.
  4. Preface
    1. Who This Book Is For
    2. Who Are We to Tell You?
    3. How We Wrote This Book
    4. How This Book Is Organized
      1. Chapter 1, What Is a Design Sprint?
      2. Chapter 2, When (and When Not) to Do a Design Sprint
      3. Chapter 3, How to Approach Design Sprints
      4. Chapter 4, Before the Design Sprint: Make a Plan
      5. Chapter 5, Phase 1: Understand
      6. Chapter 6, Phase 2: Diverge
      7. Chapter 7, Phase 3: Converge
      8. Chapter 8, Phase 4: Prototype
      9. Chapter 9, Phase 5: Test
      10. Chapter 10, After the Design Sprint: Capture, Iterate, and Continue
    5. Acknowledgments
  5. I. The What, Why, and How of Design Sprints
    1. 1. What Is a Design Sprint?
      1. Uses of a Design Sprint
        1. At the beginning of a project
        2. In the middle of a project
        3. For a mature project
      2. How the Design Sprint Came to Be
        1. From Agile
        2. From design charrettes
        3. From digital product design
        4. From Google Ventures
      3. Created for Startups, Great for Enterprises
        1. For startups
        2. For enterprises
      4. Success = Time and Money Saved + Minds Blown
        1. Success by preventing failure
        2. When you get validation
        3. Some validation, some things to fix
        4. When you don’t get validation
      5. Takeaways:
    2. 2. When (and When Not) to Do a Design Sprint
      1. Why Do a Design Sprint?
        1. Speed, efficiency, and focus will increase
        2. To align a diverse team
        3. To have a clear process
        4. To start a new project in a clear direction
      2. When Not to Use a Design Sprint
        1. The product is already very well-defined
        2. Significant research is needed beyond the scope of 1–2 days of interviews
        3. The project is only a few days in scope
        4. The business opportunity isn’t clear
        5. The scope is far too broad
        6. A more sophisticated product development effort is required
        7. You won’t break up with your idea: The IKEA effect
      3. Takeaways:
    3. 3. How to Approach Design Sprints
      1. What’s the Best Application of Design Sprints?
        1. A wide variety of projects and people
        2. A framework for timeboxed activities
      2. The Ideal Design Sprint: Five Days
        1. A full design cycle in one week
      3. Alternative Approach #1: Compact It
        1. “I can’t give you five days. I can give you two.”
      4. Alternative Approach #2: Shorten the Days
        1. “I can give you five to six hours each day”
        2. Beware of too short
      5. Alternative Approach #3: Spread It Out
        1. “Let’s do bite-sized chunks over four weeks.”
      6. Alternative Approach #4: Ultra-Compact It: A Few Hours
        1. “I can give you a few hours. What can we get done?”
      7. Alternative Approach #5: Align with Your Team’s Agile/Scrum
        1. “My engineering team follows Agile, how can this work together?”
        2. Match the design sprint length to the Scrum length
      8. Takeaways:
  6. II. How to Design Sprint
    1. 4. Before the Design Sprint: Make a Plan
      1. Determine the Timebox
      2. Construct the Agenda/s
      3. Set the Scope
      4. Pick a Facilitator
      5. What Makes a Good Facilitator?
      6. Recruit and Inform Team Members
        1. A small organization, such as a startup
        2. A team in a larger enterprise organization
        3. The studio, agency, or consulting model
      7. What Is the Difference Between Product Management and Project Management?
      8. Secure and Prepare the Space
      9. Stock Up on Supplies
      10. What’s in Your Sprint Kit?
      11. Conduct a Pre-Mortem
      12. Prepare and Distribute Background Materials
      13. Schedule Time with Users
      14. Post-it Note Pro Tip
      15. Takeaways:
    2. 5. Phase 1: Understand
      1. What Happens During the Understand Phase?
      2. Recommended Agenda
        1. Get the Background
        2. Get Inspired
        3. Define the Problem
        4. Know the User
        5. Wrap-up
      3. Get the Background
        1. Introductions
          1. How
        2. A Few of Our Favorite Icebreakers
        3. Introduce the Idea Parking Lot
          1. How
        4. Review Agenda
          1. How
        5. Rules of the Design Sprint
        6. Pitch Practice #1
          1. How
        7. Review Research and Past Work
          1. How
      4. Get Inspired
        1. Goals and Anti-Goals
          1. How
        2. Existing Product, Competitors, and Substitutes
          1. How
        3. Facts and Assumptions
          1. How
        4. Question Formulation Technique (QFT)
          1. How
          2. Context
      5. Define the Problem
        1. Problem Statement
          1. How
        2. Reframe the Problem with Challenge Maps
        3. Challenge Maps
          1. How
      6. Know the User
        1. Who/Do
          1. How
        2. Personas
          1. How
        3. Discovery Interview
          1. How
        4. User Journey Map
          1. How
        5. Daily Retrospective (Plus/Delta)
          1. How
        6. Team Drinks: Less Filling and Tastes Great!
          1. How
      7. Takeaways:
    3. 6. Phase 2: Diverge
      1. What Happens During the Diverge Phase?
      2. Recommended Agenda
        1. Gear Up
        2. Generate Solutions (At least once; 1–2 more times are optional)
        3. Generate More Solutions (Optional)
        4. Individual Wireframes (Optional)
        5. Wrap-up
      3. Gear Up
        1. Review Agenda and Rules
          1. How
        2. Background Phase Recap
          1. How
        3. Job Stories
          1. How
      4. Generate Solutions
        1. Mind Map
          1. How
        2. 8-Ups (AKA Crazy Eights)
          1. How
        3. Storyboard
          1. How
        4. Silent Critique
          1. How
        5. Group Critique
          1. How
        6. Super Vote (Optional)
          1. How
      5. Generate More (and More) Solutions
        1. Individual Wireframes
        2. Wireframes
          1. How
      6. Takeaways:
    4. 7. Phase 3: Converge
      1. What Happens During the Converge Phase?
        1. Recommended Agenda
          1. Get Started
          2. Scrutinize Your Work
          3. Wireframe the Prototype
          4. Wrap-up
      2. Get Started
        1. Scrutinize Your Work
        2. $100 Test/Risks
          1. How
        3. Identify Alternatives
          1. How
        4. 2x2 Matrix (optional)
          1. How
        5. Review Assumptions
          1. How
      3. Wireframe the Prototype
        1. Team Sketching
          1. How
        2. Ritual Dissent
          1. How
        3. Repeat the Converge Cycle
        4. Final Sketch
          1. How
      4. Takeaways:
    5. 8. Phase 4: Prototype
      1. What Happens During the Prototype Phase?
      2. Recommended Agenda
      3. Schedule and/or Confirm the Interviews
        1. Check Your Users Against the Target Persona
        2. Recruiting Test Takers: Where to Find People?
        3. Screen Out the Users Who Don’t Fit
          1. Compensation: pay them something, even if it isn’t money
      4. Build the Prototype
        1. What You Need
        2. Who Should Be Involved
        3. Review the Previous Day’s Work and Plan the Day
        4. Delegate and Assign Tasks
        5. Sketch First, Mock Up Later (Or Not)
        6. Make It
        7. A Word of Warning
        8. Prototyping Tools
        9. Examples of Prototypes
      5. Finalize the Test Plan
        1. Assumptions Table/Validation Board
          1. How
        2. Decide on the Pre-Roll Questions
        3. Define the Tasks
        4. Create the Post-Roll Questions
      6. Takeaways
    6. 9. Phase 5: Test
      1. What Happens During the Test Phase?
      2. Recommended Agenda
      3. Test Your Prototype
        1. Tools for Testing
        2. The Testing Environment
        3. When Possible: Go to the Users
        4. It Happens: Someone Will Cancel
        5. Don’t Coach Your Testers Through the Prototype
        6. Capture Artifacts
        7. User Test Interview
          1. How
      4. Debrief and Retrospective
        1. When It Works as Expected
        2. When Results Don’t Match Your Expectations
        3. When You Still Have Questions
      5. Takeaways
    7. 10. After the Design Sprint: Capture, Iterate, and Continue
      1. What Happens Next?
      2. Capture and Document
        1. For the design firm
        2. For the product team within an organization
      3. Determine Next Steps
      4. Continue the Practice
        1. Make Design Sprints Commonplace
        2. It’s in Your Hands
      5. Takeaways
  7. A. Image Credits
  8. B. O’reilly: Design Sprint
  9. Index
  10. About the Authors
  11. Copyright