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Developing Quality Technical Information: A Handbook for Writers and Editors, Third Edition by Elizabeth Wilde, Shannon Rouiller, Eric Radzinski, Deirdre Longo, Moira McFadden Lanyi, Michelle Carey

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Chapter 5. Completeness

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I try to leave out the parts that people skip.

—Elmore Leonard

From the user’s point of view, completeness means that all of the required information is available. A subject is covered completely when:

• All of the relevant information is covered

• Each subject is covered in sufficient detail

• All promised information is included

Ensuring that your information is complete involves more than checking items off of a list—it starts with building the right list of what to include. You need to understand the purpose of the information that you are creating, for example:

• Who is your audience?

• What is your audience’s level ...

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