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Disappearing Cryptography, 3rd Edition

Book Description

Cryptology is the practice of hiding digital information by means of various obfuscatory and steganographic techniques. The application of said techniques facilitates message confidentiality and sender/receiver identity authentication, and helps to ensure the integrity and security of computer passwords, ATM card information, digital signatures, DVD and HDDVD content, and electronic commerce. Cryptography is also central to digital rights management (DRM), a group of techniques for technologically controlling the use of copyrighted material that is being widely implemented and deployed at the behest of corporations that own and create revenue from the hundreds of thousands of mini-transactions that take place daily on programs like iTunes.

This new edition of our best-selling book on cryptography and information hiding delineates a number of different methods to hide information in all types of digital media files. These methods include encryption, compression, data embedding and watermarking, data mimicry, and scrambling. During the last 5 years, the continued advancement and exponential increase of computer processing power have enhanced the efficacy and scope of electronic espionage and content appropriation. Therefore, this edition has amended and expanded outdated sections in accordance with new dangers, and includes 5 completely new chapters that introduce newer more sophisticated and refined cryptographic algorithms and techniques (such as fingerprinting, synchronization, and quantization) capable of withstanding the evolved forms of attack.

Each chapter is divided into sections, first providing an introduction and high-level summary for those who wish to understand the concepts without wading through technical explanations, and then presenting concrete examples and greater detail for those who want to write their own programs. This combination of practicality and theory allows programmers and system designers to not only implement tried and true encryption procedures, but also consider probable future developments in their designs, thus fulfilling the need for preemptive caution that is becoming ever more explicit as the transference of digital media escalates.

  • Includes 5 completely new chapters that delineate the most current and sophisticated cryptographic algorithms, allowing readers to protect their information against even the most evolved electronic attacks
  • Conceptual tutelage in conjunction with detailed mathematical directives allows the reader to not only understand encryption procedures, but also to write programs which anticipate future security developments in their design

Table of Contents

  1. Brief Table of Contents
  2. Table of Contents
  3. Copyright
  4. About the Author
  5. Preface
  6. Book Notes
  7. A Start
  8. Chapter 1. Framing Information
    1. 1.1. Adding Context
  9. Chapter 2. Encryption
    1. 2.1. Pure White
    2. 2.2. Encryption and White Noise
    3. 2.3. Measuring and Encrypting Information
    4. 2.4. Summary
  10. Chapter 3. Error Correction
    1. 3.1. Close but No Cigar
    2. 3.2. Correcting Errors
    3. 3.3. Constructing Error-Correcting Codes
    4. 3.4. Summary
  11. Chapter 4. Secret Sharing
    1. 4.1. Two out of Three Musketeers
    2. 4.2. Splitting Up Secrets
    3. 4.3. Building Secret-Sharing Schemes
    4. 4.4. Public-Key Secret Sharing
    5. 4.5. Steganographic File Systems and Secret Sharing
    6. 4.6. Summary
  12. Chapter 5. Compression
    1. 5.1. Television Listing
    2. 5.2. Patterns and Compression
    3. 5.3. Building Compression Algorithms
    4. 5.4. Summary
  13. Chapter 6. Basic Mimicry
    1. 6.1. Reading between the Lines
    2. 6.2. Running in Reverse
    3. 6.3. Implementing the Mimicry
    4. 6.4. Summary
  14. Chapter 7. Grammars and Mimicry
    1. 7.1. Evolution of Everyday Things
    2. 7.2. Using Grammar for Mimicry
    3. 7.3. Creating Grammar-Based Mimicry
    4. 7.4. Summary
  15. Chapter 8. Turing and Reverse
    1. 8.1. Doggie's Little Get Along
    2. 8.2. Running Backward
    3. 8.3. Building a Reversible Machine
    4. 8.4. Summary
  16. Chapter 9. Life in the Noise
    1. 9.1. Boy-Zs in Noizy, Idaho
    2. 9.2. Hiding in the Noise
    3. 9.3. Bit Twiddling
    4. 9.4. Random Walks and Subsets
    5. 9.5. Putting JPEG to Use
    6. 9.6. Summary
  17. Chapter 10. Anonymous Remailers
    1. 10.1. Dr. Anon to You
    2. 10.2. Anonymous Remailers
    3. 10.3. Remailer Guts
    4. 10.4. Anonymous Networks
    5. 10.5. Long term storage
    6. 10.6. Publius
    7. 10.7. Onion Routing
    8. 10.8. Anonymous Auction Protocols
    9. 10.9. The Future
    10. 10.10. Summary
  18. Chapter 11. Secret Broadcasts
    1. 11.1. Table Talk
    2. 11.2. Secret Senders
    3. 11.3. Creating a DC Net
    4. 11.4. Summary
  19. Chapter 12. Keys
    1. 12.1. The Key Vision
    2. 12.2. Extending Control
    3. 12.3. Signing Algorithms
    4. 12.4. Public-Key Algorithms
    5. 12.5. Zero Knowledge Approaches
    6. 12.6. Collusion Control
    7. 12.7. Summary
  20. Chapter 13. Ordering and Reordering
    1. 13.1. Top 10 Reasons Why Top 10 Lists Fail
    2. 13.2. Introduction
    3. 13.3. Strength Against Scrambling
    4. 13.4. Invariant Forms
    5. 13.5. Canonical Forms
    6. 13.6. Packing in Multiple Messages
    7. 13.7. Sorting to Hide Information
    8. 13.8. Word Scrambling
    9. 13.9. Adding Extra Packets
    10. 13.10. Port Knocking
    11. 13.11. Continuous Use and Jamming
    12. 13.12. Summary
  21. Chapter 14. Spreading
    1. 14.1. A New Job
    2. 14.2. Spreading the Information
    3. 14.3. Going Digital
    4. 14.4. Comparative Blocks
    5. 14.5. Fast Fourier Solutions
    6. 14.6. The Fast Fourier Transform
    7. 14.7. Hiding Information with FFTs and DCTs
    8. 14.8. Wavelets
    9. 14.9. Modifications
    10. 14.10. Summary
  22. Chapter 15. Synthetic Worlds
    1. 15.1. Slam Dunks
    2. 15.2. Created Worlds
    3. 15.3. Text Position Encoding and OCR
    4. 15.4. Echo Hiding
    5. 15.5. Summary
  23. Chapter 16. Watermarks
    1. 16.1. A Patent for Watermarking Humans
    2. 16.2. Tagging Digital Documents
    3. 16.3. A Basic Watermark
    4. 16.4. An Averaging Watermark
    5. 16.5. Summary
  24. Chapter 17. Steganalysis
    1. 17.1. Code Words
    2. 17.2. Finding Hidden Messages
    3. 17.3. Typical Approaches
    4. 17.4. Visual and Aural Attacks
    5. 17.5. Structural Attacks
    6. 17.6. Statistical Attacks
    7. 17.7. Summary
  25. Chapter 18. Obfuscation
    1. 18.1. Regulation
    2. 18.2. Code Rearrangement
    3. 18.3. Compiling Intelligence
    4. 18.4. Real Tools
    5. 18.5. Summary
  26. Chapter 19. Synchronization
    1. 19.1. Stealing Baseball's Signs
    2. 19.2. Getting In Sync
    3. 19.3. Extending Other Tools
    4. 19.4. Summary
  27. Chapter 20. Translucent Databases
    1. 20.1. Missed Connections
    2. 20.2. Hiding In Databases
    3. 20.3. Using Strong One-Way Functions
    4. 20.4. Summary
  28. Chapter 21. Plain Sight
    1. 21.1. Laughtracks
    2. 21.2. Hiding in the Open
    3. 21.3. Other Formats
    4. 21.4. Summary
  29. Chapter 22. Coda
  30. Appendix A. Software
    1. A.1. Commercial Packages
    2. A.2. Open Packages
    3. A.3. Steganalysis Software
  31. Appendix Bibliographic Notes
  32. Bibliography
    1. Bibliography
  33. Index
    1. A
    2. B
    3. C
    4. D
    5. E
    6. F
    7. G
    8. H
    9. I
    10. J
    11. K
    12. L
    13. M
    14. N
    15. O
    16. P
    17. Q
    18. R
    19. S
    20. T
    21. U
    22. V
    23. W
    24. X
    25. Y