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Drawing for Graphic Design by Timothy Samara

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Drawing
/ for Graphic
Design
Processes
Selected
Case Studies:
Visual
Identity for
a Cultural
Festival
The logo and graphic language come
alive through animation, seen in the festi-
val’s promotional TV ad
/
D
/
. Accompanied
by contemporary Middle-Eastern music,
the symbol first draws itself in and then
expands outward in a continually shifting
arrangement of plane and line forms.
Although completely nonpictorial, the
language succinctly identifies the
culture and, through the movement of
its changing attributes and extension
outward into the frame space, suggests
the evolution and far-reaching influence
of Arabic culture.
In the website, transparency as an effect
returns in a short launch animation
on the home page
/
E
/
as the identity’s
typographic component is supplanted by
the symbol form, fading away as content
appears. The screen space itself, as well
as the logo, randomly recolor at periodic
intervals
/
F
/
while users browse the
pages; users also are able to repaint the
logo by clicking a specific button.
D
A television commercial promotes the festival
with an animation of the logo drawing itself in and
then expanding into new forms.
E
Transparency returns in the website; on the home page,
the symbol form constructs itself around the typographic
component, which then fades away to reveal site content.
F
These screens show alternate color
schemes that are randomly applied as the
user browses.
116
/
117
Branded
Packaging
for Bath
and
Skin-care
Products
Disturbance / Richard Hart
Durban / South Africa
Disturbance, a fourteen-member design
studio in Durban, South Africa, was
tapped to develop visual branding and
packaging for Mioja, a line of botanical
bath and skin-care products. The project
was led by Richard Hart who, together
with his sister and partner, Susie, and
Roger Jardine, a third partner, directs the
studio’s creative activities. From the proj-
ect’s very beginning, the client expressed
a desire for a clean, purely typographic
solution; Hart and his team obliged
/
A
H
/
,
but as a result of the initial presentation,
the client agreed that this approach didn’t
offer very much, freeing up the team to
explore other options.
Perhaps because of a need for distinct
brand differentiation in a crowded
product sector and also because of his
participation in a recent exhibition
of prints, Hart found himself inspired to
pursue drawing as a primary branding
element for the packaging. Preliminary
logotype studies from the typographic
approach pitted organically-drawn type-
faces for the brand logo against sharper,
geometric sans serifs
/
E, F, G
/
, both poten-
tially useful for establishing a brand
voice for the products. One identity
concept—a negative form of the initial
M created from the organization of three
petal-like forms
/
G
/
—was discarded as
a possible logo, but did lead to a pattern
that would later become a treatment for
the interiors of the products’ boxes
/
H
/
.
A–H
Purely typographic, and icon/type,
studies from the designer’s preliminary
approach to the packaging identity
I
The fine art print that provided Hart and his team
with inspiration for a new direction
A
H
B
E
C F
D
G

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