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Drawing for Graphic Design by Timothy Samara

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Basic drawing requires a little space,
some paper, and a pencil or pen. The
most important tool, however (and the
hardest to come by), is time. Drawing is
labor intensive; it necessitates a clear
mind, unencumbered by other concerns—
to understand and respond to the process
as it unfolds. In a commercial context, it’s
wise to add hours to a project proposal
to ensure the work is compensated. But
whether project-driven or independently
explored, drawing demands a period of
freedom. Rushing the process or fitting it
among other tasks usually results in unre-
solved form, incomplete understanding,
and frustration. A free mind fosters
contemplation and deeper creativity.
On a more pragmatic note, there are a
few items (beyond the basics) a designer
will find useful. Many are available at
office supply or craft stores, hardware
stores, and even pharmacies; all should
be found at professional artist supply
stores. For specialized techniques and
effects, there are hundreds of tools to
explore. It’s not critical to have every item
described here, but absolute necessities
for a basic tool kit are noted. The more
diverse a range of tools on hand, the
more seamless the process becomes.
Getting
Started:
Tools and
Prep
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
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I
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