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Electrical Applications 2 by David W. Tyler

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Illumination 117
The previous examples using the polar diagram show how the
illumination at a point may be calculated when that illumination is
due to a single source, with no reflecting surfaces nearby, e.g. as in
road lighting. If there are two or more sources, again with no
reflecting surfaces nearby, then the illuminance present
is
the sum of
the values due to individual sources. With indoor illumination how-
ever, this method cannot be used since the distances are small and
much of the illumination is the result of reflection from ceilings and
walls.
Consider a workshop which requires a given illuminance at the
bench