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Enterprise JavaBeans, Third Edition by Richard Monson-Haefel

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Conventions

The following typographical conventions are used in this book:

Italic

Used for filenames and pathnames, hostnames, domain names, URLs, and email addresses. Italic is also used for new terms where they are defined.

Constant width

Used for code examples and fragments, XML elements and tags, and SQL commands, table names, and column names. Constant width is also used for class, variable, and method names and for Java keywords used within the text.

Constant width bold

Used for emphasis in some code examples.

Constant width italic

Used to indicate text that is replaceable. For example, in BeanName PK, you would replace BeanName with a specific bean name.

Tip

Indicates a tip, suggestion, or general note.

Warning

Indicates a warning or caution.

An Enterprise JavaBean consists of many parts; it’s not a single object, but a collection of objects and interfaces. To refer to an enterprise bean as a whole, we use its business name in Roman type, followed by the acronym EJB. For example, we will refer to the Customer EJB when we want to talk about the enterprise bean in general. If we put the name in a constant-width font, we are referring explicitly to the bean’s remote interface; thus, CustomerRemote is the remote interface that defines the business methods of the Customer EJB.

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