3.6 AIX/6000
Figure 50. AIX/6000
Key Points
AIX Version 3.2 and AIX Version 4 for the RISC System/6000 currently offer
security policies and mechanisms for user authentication, password complexity,
user/port access controls, access control lists, auditing, trusted path, system
integrity, and user-resource limitations.
AIX/6000 is a secure system offering traditional UNIX type security, DCE security,
and ACL enhancements to support C2 functions.
Presentation Script
AIX Version 3.2 and AIX Version 4 for the RISC System/6000 currently offer
security policies and mechanisms for user authentication, password complexity,
user/port access controls, access control lists, auditing, trusted path, system
integrity, and user-resource limitations.
Hardware Key Lock:
AIX/6000 can be ordered with a hardware Key Lock. This
Key Lock has three positions:
Secure
104 Security P-Guide
The system is not able to boot, from hard disk or from any other device like
floppy, CD, or tape.
Normal
The system is able to boot from the hard disk only. This is the most
common position.
Service (Maintenance)
The system tries to boot from removable devices like floppy, CD, or tape. If
the system cannot find any removable boot device, then the diagnostic
software from the hard disk will be loaded.
AIX/6000:
AIX/6000 is designed to meet the National Computer Security Center
(NCSC) Trusted Computer System Evaluation Criteria (TCSEC) Class C2, with
additional support exceeding C2 for extended granular access control,
configurable identification and authentication, and system integrity checking
mechanisms. For definition of the TCSEC security levels, see section 2.6.7,
“Security Evaluation Strategy” on page 88.
The security functions offered by AIX/6000 are:
Identification and Authentication
AIX uses standard password authentication. Encrypted passwords and other
security relevant user information are kept in a directory that is not
accessible to ordinary users.
Access Control Lists (ACL)
AIX uses a combination of traditional UNIX mode bits and an Access Control
List (ACL) mechanism. An AIX ACL allows the user to restrict or permit
access for individual users, groups or combinations of users and groups.
The access permission bits (and the ACLs, if present) are modifiable only by
the owner of the file or directory.
Object Reuse
Storage objects are objects that can be read-from and written-to by
non-privileged users and are accessed through kernel system calls. The
identified storage objects on AIX are filesystem objects, heap data (mallocd
memory), a processs memory address space, shared memory segments
and sockets.
Audit
AIX has the capability of creating an audit trail of security relevant events.
The auditable events are generated by preselection of user/event
combinations that can be configured by the system administrator. The audit
trail is kept (by default) in a directory that is not accessible by ordinary
users.
System Architecture
All processes in AIX reside in their own address space. A non-privileged
process may not read or write outside of its own address space. Segment
registers, which define these address spaces, are modifiable only by the
kernel. Other, non-memory TCP resources are protected from unauthorized
access by discretionary access control.
System Integrity
Chapter 3. Platform Security 105
The RISC System/6000 performs an extensive Power On Self Test (POST)
each time the system is cold booted to check the proper functioning of its
hardware and firmware.
Application Security:
Some applications have additional application dependent
security functions such as DCE (for more information about DCE see Chapter 4,
“DCE Security” on page 111 and 2.6.2, “DCE Security Services” on page 75),
DB2/6000 and CICS/6000. (In Chapter 5, “Application Security” on page 123 you
will find some additional information about DB2 and CICS)
AIX (IBM E3/CMW):
IBM E3/CMW for the AIX operating system is a multi-level
secure workstation operating system that is based on AIX/6000 V3.2.5. It is
designed to meet E3 (ITSEC) and B1 (TCSEC) with selected functionality from the
B2 and B3 level. For definition of the TCSEC and ITSEC security levels, see
section 2.6.7, “Security Evaluation Strategy” on page 88.
The IBM E3/CMW for the AIX operating system is only available from IBM UK.
For detailed information about this operating system you have to contact IBM
UK.
Additional Information:
For additional information on AIX 4 security see the
AIX
4 Security White Paper
from the EMEA AIX Security Center of Competence
available through WWW at http://w3.munich.ibm.com/CoC-Security/.
106 Security P-Guide

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