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Event Management and Best Practices by Michael Wallace, Guilherme Pereira, Jacqueline Meckwood, Peter Glasmacher, Tony Bhe

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Appendix A. Suggested NetView configuration 417
Now you can display your seed file from the Web console. Select
Tools
Mytools View seed file from the Web console menu. A browser
window (Figure A-8) opens that shows the result of the operation.
Figure A-8 The resulting output
A smartset example
Smartsets are great when you need to group objects of the same type or in a
specific location. They provide an overview of the status of the type of selected
object without clicking through multiple submaps. An additional advantage is, in
case you defined the correct rule, the dynamic nature of a smartset.
You can define rules to include NetView objects based on the actual contents of
an attribute. For example, we define a smartset, which displays only those
connection objects, switches, and routers that are marked in a status other than
normal.
The status for a switch is maintained in two object attributes:
򐂰 IP Status attribute: Is set by the layer 3 topology management components
only. In case of a switch, it never shows the status
marginal.
418 Event Management and Best Practices
򐂰 Layer2Status attribute: Is set by IBM Tivoli Switch Analyzer and shows a
status that is
not equal normal in case IBM Tivoli Switch Analyzer cannot
status poll the ports discovered for that node.
Based on these conditions, we can develop a simple rule, which matches only
those switches that are not up and running:
򐂰 The device or object being included must be of type connector.
򐂰 Its IP status or Layer2 status must be other than normal.
Now we need to bring this into a smartset rule definition:
(('isConnector' = True) && ('IP Status' != 'Normal') || ('Layer2Status' !=
'Normal')
Then define the rule with the ruleset editor:
1. From the NetView EUI, select Tools
Smartset Editor.
2. In the window that opens, select the Text Editor button and click Add.
3. The compound rule editor opens. The editor window that you normally use to
define simple rules cannot be used in our case, because we compare status
attributes. The simple rule editor only allows us to define an equal condition in
the form <status attribute = ‘<enumeration of states>’. It negates the
result at once, which makes an ineffective definition. In our case, we want to
test for a status not equal normal.
Give the rule a name and a description. Enter the rule definitions as shown in
Figure A-9. Then click OK.
Appendix A. Suggested NetView configuration 419
Figure A-9 The rule definition
4. If you have some failing connector devices, you can test the rule. Otherwise
save it. Saving the rule creates a smartset, which remains in
Unknown status
until it is opened for the first time. Then it shows you the objects similar to
what you see in Figure A-10. This example contains the failing objects from
test case 2 in 5.2.7, “Real-life example” on page 161.
Figure A-10 A dynamic smartset
420 Event Management and Best Practices
After you resolve the failure conditions, NetView removes the affected objects
from the smartset submap as shown in Figure A-11.
Figure A-11 Test situation resolved

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