Using Keyframes
Whenever you create motion paths, change
filters over time, sculpt audio levels, or just
fade to black, you need to use keyframes.
Think of a keyframe as a kind of edit point
you set a keyframe at the point at which
you want to change the value of an effects
parameter. Keyframes work the same way
wherever they are applied.
You dont need keyframes to set a single
level or value that applies to an entire clip;
keyframes are required only if you want to
change the value at some point within the
clip. After you have added the first keyframe
to a clip, Final Cut Pro adds a new keyframe
automatically whenever you change an
effect setting for that clip at a different
point in time.
You can edit and adjust keyframes in a vari-
ety of places (Figure 14.6). Final Cut Pro
has a few different types of keyframe graphs;
basic keyframe commands work the same
in all the graphs, but each graph type can
offer unique advantages. Choose the keyframe
graph that works best for the task at hand.
Heres a quick rundown on keyframe graph
locations and features.
The Viewer’s Filters, Motion, and
Controls tabs: Keyframe graphs on the
various effects tabs in the Viewer are
located to the right of the controls for
each effect parameter. The Viewer’s
keyframe graphs provide a detailed view
of all the parameter controls for a single
effect. Heres an example: If you need to
nudge multiple parameters to sculpt a
filter, the keyframe graph of the Filters tab
is the only place where you can see the
filter’s parameter controls in relationship
to one another, or coordinate the keyframe
positions of multiple filters.
The Timelines Clip Keyframes area:
These keyframing tools are hidden by
default, but click the Timelines Clip
Keyframes control and each audio and
video track expands to reveal mini
keyframe editors beneath each clip. These
keyframe graphs are limited to the display
of a single parameter at a time. The beauty
of these graphs is that you can view and
adjust keyframes across multiple tracks.
If you’re synchronizing stacks of animated
text layers, or timing your effects to a
music track, this is the way to go.
The Timelines Keyframe overlay:
Keyframe overlay graphs are displayed
as line graphs right on top of the track
display in the Timeline. These overlays
are designed to offer easy access to clip
properties you tweak frequently: clip
opacity (for video clips) and volume level
and stereo pan position (for audio clips).
The Canvas or Viewer’s Wireframe
mode: Motion keyframes can be set and
sculpted in the Wireframe display in the
Canvas or in the Viewer. Enable Wireframe
or Image+Wireframe mode, and a wire-
frame overlay appears on your clip image.
This wireframe overlay features controls
you can use to graphically manipulate
the size, shape, and position of your
clips image. Wireframe mode is the best
place to manipulate a clips motion prop-
erties and create motion paths.
Set and adjust speed keyframes directly
on the Timelines Speed Indicator tickbar
to create fixed or variable-speed effects.
See “Creating Variable Speed Playback
Effects” in Chapter 15.
Tip
Audio keyframe overlays also appear
over the waveform display on the Viewer’s
Audio tab.
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Chapter 14
Using Keyframes
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Compositing and Effects Overview
Using Keyframes
Figure 14.6 FCP’s keyframe graphs are available in multiple locations.
Filters, Motion, and Controls tabs:
Edit and adjust keyframes in these keyframe
graphs if you need a detailed view of all the
parameter controls for a single effect.
The Canvas or Viewer’s Wireframe mode:
Set and sculpt motion keyframes to animate
motion paths; graphically manipulating your
clip’s size, shape, and movement—sure beats
entering x, y coordinates to plot each move.
Clip Keyframes area:
Use these mini keyframe editors to view
and adjust keyframes across multiple tracks.
These graphs can display keyframes only
for a single parameter at a time.
Keyframe overlay: These graphs are displayed right
on top of the Timelines track display, offering easy
access to clip opacity levels (for video clips) and
volume level and stereo pan position (for audio clips).
Speed Indicator tickbar:
Set and adjust speed keyframes
directly on the tickbar itself. To view
the tickbar, click the Clip Keyframes
button in the Timeline display.

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