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FSM-based Digital Design using Verilog HDL by Ian Elliott, Peter Minns

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3

Synthesizing Hardware from a State Diagram

3.1 INTRODUCTION TO FINITE-STATE MACHINE SYNTHESIS

At this point, the main requirements to design an FSM have been covered. However, the ideas discussed need to be practised and applied to a range of problems. This will follow in later chapters of the book and provide ways of solving particular problems.

In the development of a practical FSM there is a need to be able to convert the state diagram description into a real circuit that can be programmed into a PLD, FPGA, or other application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). As it turns out, this stage is very deterministic and mechanized.

FSM synthesis can be performed at a number of levels.

Develop an FSM using flip-flops, which can be:

  • D-type flip-flops;
  • T-type flip-flops;
  • JK-type flip-flops.

Use a high-level HDL such as VHDL. This can be used to enter the state diagram directly into the computer. The HDL can then be used to produce a design based upon any of the above flip-flop types using one of a number of technologies.

It is also possible to take the state diagram and convert it into a C program and, hence, produce a solution suitable for implementation using a micro-controller.

By using the direct synthesis approach, or an HDL, the final design can be implemented using:

  • discrete transistor–transistor logic (TTL) or complementary metal oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) components (direct synthesis);
  • PLDs;
  • FPGAs;
  • ASICs;
  • a very large-scale integration chip.

Most technologies support ...

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