Research Sources
The comic book superhero game needs research of past issues of comic
stories, future storylines scheduled and planned by the writers, and the
pen and ink concept art.
Visit the comic book’s fan websites, where fans are more than willing to
educate you in your game design of their favorite superhero. Also visit the
comic book company’s website to see how they market and promote their
property.
A TV show sitcom game needs research of the previous shows. Chat
-
ting with the writers and producer about future show storylines and
direction can also be good.
Gather pictures of the various venues in which the characters are often
seen, such as living quarters, offices, coffee shops, and stores.
Like comic book websites, the fan websites for TV shows can help you
in your design, and the show’s website will let you see how they market
and promote their property and deal with their fans.
Research all the sitcom actors’ personal backgrounds, filmography, and
previous TV work as well as the sitcom’s key behind-the-scenes personal-
ities such as the writers, producer, executive producers, and special guest
stars.
List all of the sitcom’s shows in show date order with a sentence
describing each episode.
A game based on a science fiction film may be published to coincide
with the film’s release, making it difficult for the designer to find research
information. Here, working closely with the licensor is critical and quick
responses are crucial. Prerelease photos, dailies, and unedited film footage
are needed to design the game’s storyline and provide the artists with
information they need to create character models and environments.
The movie distributor’s or production company’s website may have
photos and sales and marketing promotional materials that a designer can
use as reference material and for storyline concepts. This material can
also help depict the main and supporting character relationships and
positioning.
Discussing the film with the actors, writers, director, and producer
would be invaluable, and videotaping interviews with these people would
be a great addition to the game’s CD or DVD (similar to the film’s addi
-
tional features).
Read the science fiction and film magazines for previews of the film you
are working to design a game from.
Game Research 95
Chapter 6

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