Epilogue

In 1955, at the time of Einstein’s death, scientists still had almost no evidence of general relativity in action. However, that changed dramatically in the 1960s, when astronomers began to discover neutron stars, white dwarfs and black holes—that due to their massive bodies could curve severely the shape of space-time. Furthermore, currently general relativity is so well understood that it is used to weigh galaxies and locate distant planets.

An attempt is made to make a brief mention of all those high-flying experiments that are either currently ongoing or are at the planning stage, and whose results finally may either confirm (or contradict) Einstein’s most important predictions in special and general relativity.

Project: Fermi Gamma-Ray ...

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