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Getting a Networking Job For Dummies by Bill Hughes, Peter H. Gregory

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Chapter 9

Working as an In-House Networking Professional

Most networking professionals work as in-house experts, directly or indirectly contributing to the ongoing operation of their employer's systems and networks.

Networking jobs in private sector and nonprofit companies vary widely by industry, company size, and other factors. Some people prefer to be a one-man-band in a small company, responsible for all aspects of the systems and networks. Others prefer larger companies and to work as part of an information technology team or department. You must decide what you'll like best and where you can be successful.

Living Your Destiny

Probably the most distinguishing characteristic of being an in-house versus a consulting networking professional is that you're in the organization for the long haul. Consultants or contractors come in for a specific task or project and then leave, usually long before anyone realizes the consequences (good or bad) of their work. But as an in-house networking professional, you'll reap the fruits of your labor for years.

When you make a good decision, you'll enjoy the outcome and at times even bask in it. But when you make a poor decision, you'll be around to see the consequences and any discomfort that may result. However, you'll have the opportunity to improve both bad and good situations to make ...

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