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GNU Octave by Jesper Schmidt Hansen

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Time for action – making a surface plot

  1. First we define the domain:
    octave:102> x = [-2:0.1:2]; y = x;
    
  2. Then we generate the mesh grids:
    octave:103> [X Y] = meshgrid(x,y);
    
  3. We can now calculate the range of f for all combinations of x and y values in accordance with Equation (3.4):
    octave:104> Z = X.^2 – Y.^2;
    
  4. To make a surface plot of the graph we use:
    octave:105> surface(X,Y, Z)
    

    The result is shown below:

    Time for action – making a surface plot

What just happened?

In Command 103, X is simply a matrix, where the rows are copies of x, and Y is a matrix where the columns are copies of the elements in y. From X and Y, we can then calculate the range as done in Command 104. We see that Z

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