10-14998 Job:10-14996 Title:RP-Go Logo
#175 Dtp:221 Page:172
(RAY)
10-14998 Job:10-14996 Title:RP-Go Logo
#175 Dtp:221 Page:173
001-208_14996.indd 173 10/15/09 5:29:23 PM
Text
10
Determinant 10
Champion Mentality:
Winning, Even When You Lose
From Chambers Concise Dictionary:
Champion: someone who defends a cause; a person
who fights in single combat, sometimes for another;
a competitor who has excelled over all others; a hero
10-14998 Job:10-14996 Title:RP-Go Logo
#175 Dtp:221 Page:172
(RAY)
10-14998 Job:10-14996 Title:RP-Go Logo
#175 Dtp:221 Page:173
001-208_14996.indd 173 10/15/09 4:43:15 PM
10-14998 Job:10-14996 Title:RP-Go Logo
#175 Dtp:221 Page:174
(RAY)
001-208_14996.indd 174 10/15/09 5:29:24 PM
Text
Go Logo! A Handbook to the Art of Global Branding174
T
he words “champion” and “hero” are often inexorably intertwined in our imagina-
tions. And, for creative brand warriors, so they should be; virtually all consumers
have a default setting that positively links champion with hero on a subconscious
level. Rarely does one hear the noun champion used in a derogatory fashion.
Of course, occasionally the word is used sarcastically, as in the case of Donald
Trump, who is often referred to in the press as the “champion of expensive glitz.”
But, in the context of Go Logo! Trump is
an excellent example of a successful brand
warrior who has relentlessly used every
form of media to build the Trump brand.
“The Donald,” despite the outcries from his
numerous vocal critics in New York, has
accomplished precisely what he set out to
do—establish Trump as a synonym for a
bold, lavish, expansive (and even exclusive)
aura in the minds of a specific breed of po-
tential buyer. Of course, from the perspec-
tive of a great many Europeans, he also is
a good stand-in for a certain kind of brash,
crass American. But his brand, because of
its overstated persona, does an awful lot of
hard selling for his properties.
Champions have almost always been re-
vered, particularly in their ancient roles as
warriors. Not much has changed. Many of
our cultural heroes, and not just those in
sports, appreciate the comparison to heroic
warriors, as they strive to earn the right to
be known as “the champion” in their respec-
tive careers.
Bestowing the sobriquet “champion” to
a brand can be advantageous in both the
short and long term. The Wheaties ce-
real brand has used the slogan “Breakfast
of Champions” for more years than even
I can remember. And the winning Super
Bowl team members, as they try to get off
the field, are prompted to say, “I’m going
to Disney World!” This subtle brand con-
nection is valuable. Think of all the World
Cups and World Championships, in so many
global sports, not to mention the Olympics,
that link brands with winners. The sports
and media industries, especially, depend on
sponsorship or broadcasting rights.
And what about the cultural arts and popular
entertainment worlds? Don’t they have cham-
pions? Many would claim, justifiably, that an
even bigger mountain of money is spent in
pursuit of the entertainment and emotional
satisfaction derived from being transported
to another place via music, film, plays, and,
progressively, any number of electronic
means. Our admiration for the athlete and
10-14998 Job:10-14996 Title:RP-Go Logo
#175 Dtp:221 Page:174
(RAY)
001-208_14996.indd 174 10/15/09 4:43:15 PM

Get Go Logo! A Handbook to the Art of Global Branding now with the O’Reilly learning platform.

O’Reilly members experience live online training, plus books, videos, and digital content from nearly 200 publishers.