O'Reilly logo

Grammar of the Shot, 2nd Edition by Christopher J. Bowen, Roy Thompson

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

End of Chapter Two Review

  1. Provide appropriate headroom for each shot type.
  2. Decide if a subjective (to camera) or objective (not to camera) shooting style is more appropriate for your project.
  3. Create ample look room for your subject to balance the weight of the frame.
  4. Follow the rule of thirds and place important objects along the one-third lines within the frame, both horizontally and vertically.
  5. Choose a horizontal camera angle around your subject for more meaningful coverage (the 3/4 profile being the most popular).
  6. Shoot from a neutral, high, or low vertical camera angle to inform an audience about a character’s “power dynamic.”
  7. Profile and direct to camera two-shots work best from long to medium shots, but over-the-shoulder two-shots will ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required