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Green Materials for Electronics

Book Description

Combining the materials science, technological, and device aspects of organic bioelectronics based on green materials, this is the first overview of the emerging concepts involving fabrication techniques for sustainable electronics with low energy and material consumption.
With contributions from top-notch editors and authors, in one focus, the book covers a collection of natural materials suited for electronics applications such as paper, silk, melanin, DNA and nucleobases, resins, gums, saccharides, cellulose, gelatine and peptides. In another thrust, the book focuses on device fabrication based on these materials, including processing aspects, and applications such as sensors, signal transducers, transient, implantable and digestible electronics.
With its interdisciplinary approach this text will appeal to the chemistry, physics, materials science, and engineering communities.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. List of Contributors
  5. Preface
  6. Chapter 1: Emerging “Green” Materials and Technologies for Electronics
    1. 1.1 Introduction to “Green” Materials for Electronics
    2. 1.2 Paper
    3. 1.3 DNA and Nucleobases
    4. 1.4 Silk
    5. 1.5 Saccharides
    6. 1.6 Aloe Vera, Natural Waxes, and Gums
    7. 1.7 Cellulose and Cellulose Derivatives
    8. 1.8 Resins
    9. 1.9 Gelatine
    10. 1.10 Proteins, Peptides, Aminoacids
    11. 1.11 Natural and Nature-Inspired Semiconductors
    12. 1.12 Perspectives
    13. References
  7. Chapter 2: Fabrication Approaches for Conducting Polymer Devices
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 Photolithography
    3. 2.3 Printing
    4. 2.4 Conclusions
    5. References
  8. Chapter 3: Biocompatible Circuits for Human–Machine Interfacing
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 Ion Transport Mechanisms
    3. 3.3 Organic Electronic Ion Pump
    4. 3.4 Ion Diodes, Transistors, and Circuits
    5. 3.5 Conclusions
    6. References
  9. Chapter 4: Biocompatible Devices and Sustainable Processes for Green Electronics: Biocompatible Organic Electronic Devices for Sensing Applications
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Fundamental Aspects of OTFT Sensors
    3. 4.3 OTFT: Sensing Applications
    4. 4.4 OTFTs: Biosensors
    5. 4.5 Conclusions
    6. References
  10. Chapter 5: Biocompatible Materials for Transient Electronics
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 Mechanisms of Dissolution of Monocrystalline Silicon Nanomembranes (Si NMs)
    3. 5.3 Dissolution Mechanisms of Transient Conductors and Insulators
    4. 5.4 Tunable/Programmable Transience
    5. 5.5 Transient Electronic Systems
    6. 5.6 Functional Transformation via Transience
    7. 5.7 Biocompatiblity and Bioresorption
    8. 5.8 Practical Applications in Medical Implants
    9. 5.9 Conclusions
    10. References
  11. Chapter 6: Paper Electronics
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Paper as a Substrate for Electronics
    3. 6.3 Application Areas for Paper Electronics
    4. 6.4 Green Electronics on Paper
    5. 6.5 Paper-Based Analytical Devices and Test Platforms
    6. 6.6 Summary and Future Outlook
    7. References
  12. Chapter 7: Engineering DNA and Nucleobases for Present and Future Device Applications
    1. 7.1 The Versatile World of Nucleic Acids
    2. 7.2 Nucleic Acids in Electronics
    3. 7.3 Nucleic Acids in Nanotechnology
    4. 7.4 DNA Molecular Engineering
    5. 7.5 Summary and Future Outlook
    6. Acknowledgments
    7. References
  13. Chapter 8: Grotthuss Mechanism: From Proton Transport in Ion Channels to Bioprotonic Devices
    1. 8.1 Introduction
    2. 8.2 Proton Wires: Chains of Hydrogen Bonds and Grotthuss Mechanisms
    3. 8.3 Proton Transport in Proton Channels
    4. 8.4 Proton Transport across Membranes and Oxidative Phosphorylation
    5. 8.5 Biopolymer Proton Conductors
    6. 8.6 Devices Based on Proton Conductors
    7. 8.7 Bioprotonic Devices: Diodes, Transistors, Memories, and Transducers
    8. 8.8 Future Outlook
    9. Acknowledgments
    10. References
  14. Chapter 9: Emulating Natural Photosynthetic Apparatus by Employing Synthetic Membrane Proteins in Polymeric Membranes
    1. 9.1 Introduction
    2. 9.2 Light-Harvesting Complex II
    3. 9.3 Natural Proteins in Natural Membrane Assemblies
    4. 9.4 Plant-Inspired Photovoltaics: The Twenty-First Century and Beyond
    5. References
  15. Chapter 10: Organic Optoelectronic Interfaces for Vision Restoration
    1. 10.1 Introduction
    2. 10.2 Retinal Implants for Vision Restoration
    3. 10.3 Perspectives
    4. References
  16. Chapter 11: Nanostructured Silica from Diatoms Microalgae: Smart Materials for Photonics and Electronics
    1. 11.1 Diatoms: Living Cells in Glass Houses
    2. 11.2 Diatom Frustules in Photonics and Optics
    3. 11.3 Diatom Frustules in Electronics
    4. 11.4 Conclusions
    5. Acknowledgments
    6. References
  17. Index
  18. End User License Agreement