O'Reilly logo

Handbook of Smart Antennas for RFID Systems by Nemai Chandra Karmakar

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

CHAPTER 4

RFID READERS—REVIEW AND DESIGN

STEVAN PRERADOVIC and NEMAI CHANDRA KARMAKAR

Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering, Clayton, Victoria, Australia

4.1 INTRODUCTION

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is a wireless data capturing technique that utilizes radio-frequency (RF) waves for automatic identification of objects. RFID relies on RF waves for data transmission between the data-carrying device, called the RFID tag, and the interrogator [1, 2].

A typical RFID system is shown in Figure 4.1. An RFID system consists of three major components: a reader or interrogator, which sends the interrogation signals to an RFID tag, which is to be identified; an RFID tag or transponder, which contains the identification code; and middleware software, which maintains the interface and the software protocol to encode and decode the identification data from the reader into a mainframe or personal computer. The RFID reader can read tags only within the reader’s interrogation zone. The reader is most commonly connected to a host computer that performs additional signal processing and has a display of the tag’s identity. The host computer can also be connected via Internet for global connectivity/networking.

FIGURE 4.1 Block diagram of a typical RFID system.

RFID was first proposed by Stockman [1] in his landmark paper “Communication by Means of Reflected Power” in ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required