O'Reilly logo

Head First Learn to Code by Eric Freeman

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Chapter 2. 1 thinking computationally: Getting Started

Image

Knowing how to think computationally puts you in control. It’s no secret the world around you is becoming more connected, more configurable, more programmable, and more, well, computational. You can remain a passive participant, or you can learn to code. When you can code, you’re the director, the creator—you’re telling all those computers what they should be doing for you. When you can code, you control your own destiny (or at least you’ll be able to program your internet-connected lawn sprinker system). But how do you learn to code? First, learn to think computationally. Next, you grab a programming language so you can speak the same lingo as your computer, mobile device, or anything with a CPU. What’s in it for you? More time, more power, and more creative possibilities to do the things you really want to do. Come on, let’s get started...

Breaking it down

The first thing that stands between you and writing your first real piece of code is learning the skill of breaking problems down into achievable little actions that a computer can do for you. Of course, you and the computer will also need to be speaking a common language, but we’ll get to that topic in just a bit.

Image

Now breaking problems down into a number of steps ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required