O'Reilly logo

Illuminating Statistical Analysis Using Scenarios and Simulations by Jeffrey E. Kottemann

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

7Judging Opinion Splits I

We can put what we now know to use for public-opinion surveying. We'll ask people whether they agree or disagree with something. This agree or disagree item is a binomial variable. Our null hypothesis is that the community is evenly split in opinion, that is, 50% agree and 50% disagree overall. We'll gather our evidence by surveying 30 people. To avoid inadvertent bias when gathering sample opinions for our survey, everyone in the community must have an equal chance of being surveyed. Therefore, we'll select 30 people at random, giving us a random sample of 30 opinions. The 30 opinions serve as our evidence.

This surveying situation is analogous to coin flipping. Given our null hypothesis that the community is evenly split (coin is fair), by randomly selecting each person to survey (each flip) we expect a 0.5 ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required