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iMovie® '09 & iDVD® '09® For Dummies® by Michael Cohen, Dennis Cohen

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Chapter 5. Creating a Project

When we talk about projects in this book, we aren't using a polite euphemism for public housing. All your iMovie content exists in your Event Library, ready for use in your creative endeavors that we call movies. Hollywood doesn't call them movies or motion pictures, however, until they're released for public consumption (usually hyped beyond rational belief). Until the movie's release, however, the Industry calls them projects. When two directors meet, "What's your latest project?" is a question almost guaranteed to arise. Similarly, actors instruct their agents to find them a "good project."

We tend to think of a movie project in a manner similar to the way a Hollywood studio does: as the planning, scripting, casting, shooting, editing, and so forth that goes into producing our end result: a movie.

In this chapter, we explore what a project is, how to create a project, how to browse a project's content, and how to change default settings for a project. Additionally, we discuss how the Event Library lets you share clips between projects.

In This Chapter

What Is an iMovie Project?

When iMovie uses the word Project, the definition is much narrower than ours (or that of a movie studio). To iMovie, a project is where you assemble the video from your Event Library that ...

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