Chapter 9

Active Electronics

Madhusudan Singh,1 Hanna M. Haverinen,2 Yuka Yoshioka3 and Ghassan E. Jabbour*,4

1Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, USA

2Solar and Alternative Energy Engineering Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Saudi Arabia

3Heraeus Materials Technology, USA

4Department of Electrical Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Solar and Alternative Energy Engineering Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Saudi Arabia

 

*Corresponding author. ghassan.jabbour@kaust.edu.sa

9.1 Introduction

According to various industry estimates, including the organic electronics roadmap, the size of the printed electronics industry is expected to exceed billions of dollars in the coming decades. A recent IDTechEx report (Das and Harrop, 2011) states that the market for printed and thin-film electronics will reach US$44.25 billion in 2021. Inkjet printing has the potential to contribute significantly in this rapidly growing area. We have seen in Chapter 7 how electrical conductors and passive components can be fabricated by inkjet methods; here we shall review the application of inkjet printing to active electronic devices. In this field, the particular merits of inkjet include the fact that it provides a noncontact, maskless additive patterning process, which can be used to deposit and pattern a very wide range of materials (Lewis, 2006). ...

Get Inkjet Technology for Digital Fabrication now with O’Reilly online learning.

O’Reilly members experience live online training, plus books, videos, and digital content from 200+ publishers.