O'Reilly logo

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Innovation Management

Book Description

As a consequence of social, technological, political and economic changes, the field of organizations management and engineering becomes highly complex, calling for more effective strategies. In this book, the authors discuss innovative technological resources and their implications on organizational policies, strategies, and flexibility, as well as on sustainable management.

Table of Contents

  1. Also of Interest
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Table of Contents
  5. Preface
  6. List of contributing authors
  7. 1 The Link between Technological Focus and Innovative Capacities
    1. 1.1 Introduction
      1. 1.1.1 Purpose
      2. 1.1.2 Study Design
    2. 1.2 Theory
      1. 1.2.1 Services
      2. 1.2.2 Technology
      3. 1.2.3 Technology Focus
      4. 1.2.4 Gauging Technology Focus
        1. 1.2.4.1 Literature
        2. 1.2.4.2 Expert Interviews
        3. 1.2.4.3 Gauging Tool
        4. 1.2.4.4 Assessing the Proposed Scale
      5. 1.2.5 Innovation
        1. 1.2.5.1 Novelty as the Basic Characteristic
        2. 1.2.5.2 Classification
        3. 1.2.5.3 Service Innovation
        4. 1.2.5.4 Defining Service Innovation
      6. 1.2.6 Innovative Capacities
        1. 1.2.6.1 Definitions
        2. 1.2.6.2 Resource-Based Views
        3. 1.2.6.3 Competence-Based Views
        4. 1.2.6.4 Ambidextrous Organization
        5. 1.2.6.5 Clients’ Integration in Services
        6. 1.2.6.6 Path Dependency
        7. 1.2.6.7 Innovation Process and Implementation Competence
      7. 1.2.7 Innovative Capacities Maturity Model
        1. 1.2.7.1 Conceptual Definition of the Degrees of Maturity
        2. 1.2.7.2 First Degree of Maturity
        3. 1.2.7.3 Second Degree of Maturity
        4. 1.2.7.4 Third Degree of Maturity
        5. 1.2.7.5 Fourth Degree of Maturity
        6. 1.2.7.6 Fifth Degree of Maturity
        7. 1.2.7.7 Summary
    3. 1.3 Empirical Study
      1. 1.3.1 Selection of Research Objects
      2. 1.3.2 Selection of Experts
      3. 1.3.3 Empirical Tools
      4. 1.3.4 Analysis
        1. 1.3.4.1 Assessment of the Maturity Model
        2. 1.3.4.2 Points System Replacing the Maturity Model
    4. 1.4 Conclusions and Discussion
      1. 1.4.1 Conclusions
      2. 1.4.2 Critical Assessment
      3. 1.4.3 Discussion
    5. Bibliography
  8. 2 Uptake Of Market ‘Induced Innovation’ by Upstream Actors in Tanzania
    1. 2.1 Introduction
      1. 2.1.1 The concept of innovation
    2. 2.2 Literature review
      1. 2.2.1 Innovation in the value chain
        1. 2.2.1.1 Product innovation
        2. 2.2.1.2 Process innovation
        3. 2.2.1.3 Organizational innovation
      2. 2.2.2 Innovation capacity at the firm level
      3. 2.2.3 Innovation in the food industry driven by modern retailers
        1. 2.2.3.1 Implication for Tanzania
    3. 2.3 Methodology
      1. 2.3.1 Data collection
      2. 2.3.2 Data analysis
      3. 2.3.3 The analysis step
        1. 2.3.3.1 Developing coding materials
    4. 2.4 Findings
      1. 2.4.1 Organizational innovation
        1. 2.4.1.1 Production innovation
        2. 2.4.1.2 Uptake ability
        3. 2.4.1.3 Lack of trust among actors in the value chain
        4. 2.4.1.4 Reluctance to internally originated new ideas
        5. 2.4.1.5 Influence of external organizations
    5. 2.5 Conclusion
    6. Bibliography
  9. 3 Customer Experience, Technology and Innovation: Evidence from Georgian London and the Victorian Era
    1. 3.1 Georgian Londoners and Victorian Entrepreneurs
      1. 3.1.1 The Question of Newness
    2. 3.2 London Coffeehouses and the Georgians
    3. 3.3 Shipping Frozen Meat from New Zealand to London
    4. 3.4 A Final Remark
    5. Bibliography
  10. 4 Industrial Resilience: Reframing the Role of Innovation Policies for Regional Development
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 A world of ‘distributed’ capabilities in global value chains
    3. 4.3 Local environment and regional competitiveness
    4. 4.4 Reframing the industrialization debate
    5. 4.5 New challenges for a regional innovation policy agenda
    6. Bibliography
  11. 5 Innovation Knowledge Management Nexus
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 Background
      1. 5.2.1 KM and Innovation: The Missing Link
      2. 5.2.2 Knowledge Management and Innovation: How Are They Related?
    3. 5.3 Innovation
      1. 5.3.1 Importance of Innovation
      2. 5.3.2 Scope of Innovation
      3. 5.3.3 Innovation at the Firm Level
    4. 5.4 Knowledge Management
      1. 5.4.1 Tacit Knowledge
      2. 5.4.2 Explicit Knowledge
      3. 5.4.3 Relationship Between KM and Innovation
    5. 5.5 Conceptual Framework
      1. 5.5.1 Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Factors
      2. 5.5.2 Knowledge Management Activities
      3. 5.5.3 Knowledge Assets
      4. 5.5.4 Human Capital
      5. 5.5.5 Knowledge Repositories
    6. 5.6 Knowledge Transformation Success and Innovation
      1. 5.6.1 Knowledge Embeddedness
      2. 5.6.2 Knowledge Articulability
      3. 5.6.3 Organizational Distance
      4. 5.6.4 Knowledge Distance
      5. 5.6.5 Physical Distance
      6. 5.6.6 Project Priority
      7. 5.6.7 Learning Culture
    7. 5.7 Knowledge Transformation Process
    8. 5.8 Knowledge Transformation, Collaboration and Integration for Innovation
      1. 5.8.1 Organizational Learning and Innovation
      2. 5.8.2 Organizational Culture and Innovation
    9. 5.9 Innovation Knowledge Management Nexus
      1. 5.9.1 KM Processes in Innovative Firms
      2. 5.9.2 Knowledge Processes and Practices for Innovation
    10. 5.10 Solutions and Recommendations
      1. 5.10.1 Guidelines for Motivating Innovation
    11. 5.11 Future Research Directions
    12. 5.12 Conclusion
    13. 5.13 Key Terms and Definitions
    14. Bibliography
  12. 6 Human Capital Accounting: A Contribution to Innovation Management or a Fairy Tale?
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 The Evolution of Human Capital Accounting
    3. 6.3 Call for HCA from Human Resources Management Literature
    4. 6.4 The Emergence of Intellectual Capital – New Demands Over an Old Problem
    5. 6.5 Reporting on Human Capital
    6. 6.6 Human Capital Accounting as a Challenge to Both Accounting and HRM Fields
    7. 6.7 Conclusions
    8. Bibliography
  13. 7 Beyond the 3C Model in Collaboration Platforms: A Case Study
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 Literature Review
      1. 7.2.1 3C Collaboration Model
      2. 7.2.2 Interactivity
      3. 7.2.3 Related Work
    3. 7.3 Methodological Procedures
    4. 7.4 Results
      1. 7.4.1 Description of the Platform
      2. 7.4.2 Analysis of the Features of the Platform
    5. 7.5 Final Remarks
    6. Bibliography
  14. 8 Emotion and Work: an Innovative Relationship?
    1. 8.1 Introduction
    2. 8.2 Emotional Intelligence (EI)
      1. 8.2.1 History and Definition
      2. 8.2.2 Measuring Emotional Intelligence
    3. 8.3 Job Performance
    4. 8.4 Emotional Intelligence and Job Performance
      1. 8.4.1 The Relationship Between Leadership and Emotional Intelligence
    5. 8.5 EI Relevance for Management
    6. 8.6 Conclusions
    7. Bibliography
  15. Index