chapter 7: editing your shots 169
Consequently, you may find that Enhance has no real effect on some photos, and only
minimally improves others. Remember, too, that you cant enhance just one part of
a photo—only the entire picture at once. If you want to selectively adjust specific
portions of a picture, you need a true photo-editing program like GraphicConverter
or Photoshop Elements.
Tip: If using the Enhance command improves your photo, but just not enough, you can click it repeatedly
to amplify its effect—as many times as you want, really. However, applying Enhance more than three times
or so risks turning your photo into digital mush.
If you go too far, remember that you can press c-Z (or choose EditÆUndo) to backtrack. In fact, you can
take back as many steps as you like, all the way back to the original photo.
In some cases, you’ll need to do more than just click the Enhance button to coax the
best possible results from your digital photos. You may have to tweak away with the
Brightness and Contrast sliders, as explained later in this chapter.
Red-Eye
Let’s say you snap a near-perfect family portrait: The focus is sharp, the composition
is balanced, everyones smiling. And then you notice it: Uncle Mitch, standing dead
center in the picture, looks like a vampire bat. His eyes are glowing red, as though
illuminated by the evil within.
You’ve been victimized by red eye, a common problem in flash photography. This
creepy possessed-by-aliens look has ruined many an otherwise-great photo.
Red eye is actually light reflected back from your subject’s eyes. The bright light of
your cameras flash passes through the pupil of each eye, illuminating the blood-red
The Enhance Button
Figure 7-6:
The Enhance command
works particularly well
on photos that are
slightly dark and that
lack good contrast, like
the original photo on
the left.

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