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IRC Hacks by Paul Mutton

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Chapter 2. Using IRC

Introduction: Hacks #5-11

Now that you know how to connect to IRC, it’s time to get familiar with the way it works. It is essential to understand the IRC model of networks, servers, channels, and users to chat with individuals and groups alike. IRC is quite often a free-for-all, where unique nicknames are allocated to the first people to ask for them. If you are lucky enough to get the nickname you want, this chapter will show you how to protect this valuable asset and ensure that you can always use it when you reconnect to that particular IRC network.

As with all mature Internet-based technologies, a variety of acronyms and abbreviations are commonly used on IRC. This chapter will familiarize you with the essential lingo, so you won’t get confused when people start asking WTH you don’t RTFM.

IRC gives you the freedom of creating your own channels—groups of users that share a common interest or theme. This chapter also provides your first glimpse into channel management, showing you how to use ChanServ and CHANFIX to protect your own channel from abuse and to keep out unwelcome visitors.

The IRC Model

If you are totally new to IRC, you may be wondering where to begin. Understand the conceptual model of Internet Relay Chat for a good start.

Internet Relay Chat was originally implemented so that users of bulletin board systems could chat with one another in real time. It has grown considerably since then, and thousands of networks of servers are now available for ...

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