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Java I/O by Elliotte Rusty Harold

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Appendix A. Additional Resources

When I began work on this book, I thought it would take me about 200 pages and about two months. Now, more than a year and 500 pages later, I can see that I/O is a far larger, more important, and more encompassing topic than I originally guessed. Many chapters could easily lead to books of their own. Indeed, several (Chapter 5, and Chapter 10) already are other books.

Since I can’t possibly say everything there is to say about all these fascinating topics I’ve touched on in one page or another in this tome, I’d like to point you to several books, mailing lists, and web sites that explore some of the issues raised in this book in greater detail. Some of these are I/O-specific; some are mostly tangential. However, they’re all interesting and worthy of further study and thought.

Digital Think

Digital Think (http://www.digitalthink.com/) offers web-based training courses for programmers, developers, system administrators, and end users in C, C++, Java, Windows, web development, object-oriented programming, and more. This book grew out of two web-based courses I wrote for Digital Think, Java Streams (http://www.digitalthink.com/catalog/cs/cs108/) and Java Readers and Writers (http://www.digitalthink.com/catalog/cs/cs208/). Although this book is far more comprehensive than those two courses, they’re a good way to get started with this material, especially if you think you need a personal helping hand or a leg up. Each course includes graded exercises, a ...

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