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JavaScript™ 1.5 by Example by Kathie Kingsley-Hughes, Adrian Kingsley-Hughes

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Access to Page Elements

During the days of Internet Explore 3.0 and Netscape Navigator 3.0 (no, not as long ago as it sounds!), Web developers could access some of the elements on a Web page using script. These select elements were elements such as <a> (the anchor tag), <applet> (the applet tag), and <form> (defines a form).

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Looking back, it's amazing to think what clever Web developers managed to do using this limited capability! There was a lot of great stuff on the Web even then!

However, limits to what you could do did exist. For example, even if you wanted to access a heading, you couldn't.

Until now. With the DOM this isn't the case any more. Every single element on the Web page is now accessible. The document features a collection ...

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