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Java™ Web Services Unleashed by Mark Wutka, Joseph Weber, Arthur Ryman, K. Scott Morrison, Benoît Marchal, Matthias Kloppmann, Steven Haines, Darren Govoni, Francisco Curbera, Frank Cohen, Robert Brunner

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Accessing a Web Service via a WSDL Document

The whole reason for declaring a WSDL document is, of course, to allow consumers to access your Web service. As a client of a Web service you want to be able to read the WSDL document and produce Java code to interact with it. You can do this in several ways. Clearly, one way is to read the WSDL document and produce by hand the code necessary to talk to the WSDL document. The process you work through here is similar to the processes you learned about in the SOAP chapters earlier.

Creating WSDL Proxy Classes

It seems unlikely that, as a Java developer, you will go through the whole process of creating the access to the service manually. Doing so would be time consuming, and it is fortunately not necessary. ...

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