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Linux® For Dummies®, 8th Edition by Richard Blum, Dee-Ann LeBlanc

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Ripping Music Tracks from CDs

This is another topic that’s impossible to cover without at least acknowledging that both ethical and legal issues are involved. I’m not going to get into legalities here, but my personal ethics are that it’s fine to rip (copy) music off my own CDs for my own use. If I want to pull my favorite songs off CDs that I purchased and set them up so I can listen to them collectively in a random playlist off my computer’s hard drive, I don’t see a problem with this. However, doing this and then taking the CD back for a refund is theft, in my opinion.

So, with that said, to rip the tracks off of your CDs in Linux:

1.
Choose ApplicationsSound & VideoSound Juicer CD Extractor (see Figure 13-7).
Figure 13-7. The Sound Juicer CD Extractor in Fedora.

2.
For each song that you don’t want to rip, uncheck the check box next to the song. The check mark disappears for each song that you don’t want to digitize.
3.
Choose EditPreferences. The Preferences dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 13-8.
Figure 13-8. The Sound Juicer Preferences dialog box.

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