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Linux® For Dummies®, 8th Edition by Richard Blum, Dee-Ann LeBlanc

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Troubleshooting

As with everything else with computers, there are always places for things to go wrong while creating a file server. Here’s a brief list of some places to watch when things don’t work as planned:

Users can’t access their shared folders: Check all the permissions. First, check to make sure that the proper Linux group is set for the folder, and then check to make sure that the group has the proper permissions for the folder. Finally, check to make sure that the individual users are members of the Linux group.
 After you’ve verified that the Linux permissions are OK, look into the Samba permissions. Check to make sure that the proper Samba user accounts have been given access to the share.
Users can’t see shares when they browse the network: Check to make sure that the Visible check box is enabled for the share in the Samba Configuration window. Selecting this check box allows Samba to advertise the share on the network. If this check box is not selected, the share will not be advertised, and it won’t appear when clients browse the network.

 This can be used as an extra security feature. Hackers can’t try to break into what they can’t see. Valid users can map to the share manually by using the Microsoft network name \\servername\sharename.
Users can’t see the file server when they browse the network: Make sure that the smb service is enabled in the Services Configuration ...

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