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Linux in a Nutshell, Fourth Edition by Aaron Weber, Stephen Figgins, Ellen Siever

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Name

rcsmerge

Synopsis

                  rcsmerge [options] file
               

Perform a three-way merge of file revisions, taking two differing versions and incorporating the changes into the working file. You must provide either one or two revisions to merge (typically with -r). Overlaps are handled the same as with merge, by placing warnings in the resulting file. rcsmerge accepts the standard options -q, -V, -x, and -z. rcsmerge exits with a status of 0 (no overlaps), 1 (some overlaps), or 2 (unknown problem).

Options

-k c

When comparing revisions, expand keywords using style c. (See co for values of c.)

-p[R]

Send merged version to standard output instead of overwriting file.

-r[R]

Merge revision R or, if no R is given, merge the latest revision.

Examples

Say you need to add updates to an old revision (1.3) of prog.c, but the current file is already at revision 1.6. To incorporate the changes:

                  co -l prog.c
                  (edit latest revision by adding revision 1.3 updates, then:)
                  rcsmerge -p -r1.3 -r1.6 prog.c > prog.updated.c

Undo changes between revisions 3.5 and 3.2, and overwrite the working file:

                  rcsmerge -r3.5 -r3.2 chap08

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