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3000 INITIAL & CREST LOGOS
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> Some 4,000 years ago, craftsmen marked their
wares with a simple glyph—an identi er that became
a predecessor of initial logo designs today.
LOGOLOUNGE
MASTER LIBRARY
INITIAL & CREST LOGOS
introduction
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MASTERlibrary
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Literacy is a miracle of modern technology.
Even ve hundred years ago, the ability to read
was still rare. Through the development of printing
and now the electronic transmission of informa-
tion, we have progressed from a society that
recognizes glyphs as pictures that represent
something to a people who can read and write
letters. This is true in most societies except for
those like China, where to read a newspaper or
>
Imagine Demetri, a fi ctitious
Corinthian potter crafting large vessels for
transporting olive oil some 4,000 years ago.
If you could have asked this artisan about the
meaning behind the small glyph he imprinted
on the bottom of all of his wares, his answer
would have been simple. The mark—three
stacked, wavy lines—was meant to represent
him and his small shop, which was located
beside a wide stream—no more, no less. It was
a mark that could be read by anyone, literate
and illiterate alike (himself among the latter).
That the weight of the lines or their color or the
degree of their waviness could have additional
meaning would have been superfl uous informa-
tion to young Demetri. In an age when people
were defi ned by trade or location or ancestry,
not by surname and certainly not by company
name, Demetri was the potter who worked by
the stream. That’s all you needed to know.
The world’s a much more complicated place
today, and differentiation between potters and
trades of all sorts is by necessity much more
defi ned and refi ned. It’s curious, though, that an
identifi cation system developed thousands of years
ago for a largely illiterate society is enormously
successful in today’s much more literate world.
> The use of an initial in a logo design provides a simple
mneumonic device, but the simple character is rich with
meaning. Each new initial design is completely different
from all others, even though it uses as its base a very
familiar alphabetic character. (All designs created by
Gardner Design.)
TOP DOWN: Collins Bus Corporation, Conco
Construction, Smart Tech, Surency Life and Health
INITIALS
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