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LogoLounge Master Library, Volume 2 by Bill Gardner, Catharine Fishel

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Job:01714 Title:Logolounge Mester Library Voi 2
(Rockport) Page:24
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Job:01714 Title:Logolounge Mester Library Voi 2
(Rockport) Page:24
A logo that I created and still like a lot is for the
California Conservation Corps. Basically, the
Corps’ mission is to conserve natural resources
for future generations. I took a graphical version
of a mother brown bear—the brown bear is the
state animal of California—and created a cub out
of the negative space in her body.
This logo became a symbol for protection of
natural resources for future generations. It tied
Michael Vanderbyl is dean of design
of California College of the Arts. He established
Vanderbyl Design in 1973 and has since gone on
to work in many fi elds of design, most recently in
furniture retail spaces. An acclaimed speaker and
winner of dozens of design awards, Vanderbyl is
known for his gurative, storytelling logos, many of
which have survived well for decades.
Why do animals spark the creative mind
like they do?
>
Often, animals come to mind on a logo project
because they are integral to the subject. For
instance, it would be hard to do a logo for Coyote
Books without using a coyote.
But animals are gurative elements that people
relate to. They’re friendly, even when we show
them as ferocious animals. The Cardinals
football team has this ferocious-looking bird
logo, but it still cracks me up.
Animals also end up serving as metaphors for
the human condition. Pixar has lots of movies
like this, starring sh or panda bears. They take
the place of humans and their various traits,
and human viewers are more accepting of them.
Animals aren’t politicized; they are neutral.
Especially in logos, you don’t want something
that is already politicized or culturally off-putting.
Using an animal in a logo brings things to a
different plane, a more neutral place.
I also think that animals, for the most part, are
thought of fondly by people. Almost everyone
has seen animals in nature or at the zoo, or they
have pets. So including an animal creates a safe
place. The designer is the one who adds the
personality that is unique to the project.
Animals also have interesting shapes that are so
much more engaging than the human shape. We
tend to view them from the side, not the front as
we do when we picture people. The face is the
way into getting to know a person; body shape is
how we get to know animals.
Why are we so prone to turn animals into
symbols?
>
A lot of animals already have a symbolic
nature—tenacity or sweetness, for example. We
just take that nature and build on it. Puma, as a
brand, has done that very well. The actual
animal is sleek and fast, and therefore the logo
based on it successfully re ects the product.
You just have to
consider very carefully
all of the attributes of
an animal before you
include it
in a design.
=
Micheal Vanderbyl, Vanderbyl Design
The Power of
Stories
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