O'Reilly logo

LogoLounge by Catharine Fishel, Bill Gardner

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

62
Learning Curve, the parent company behind many educational
toy lines, is an expert in offering products that it calls playtime-
enrichment toys.” Focus-group studies agreed, as did the spe-
cialty stores that carry the companys products.
In fact, just about everyone agreed that if there was a manufac-
turer that was altruistic and trustworthy enough to be recognized
as a leader in developmental toys, it was Learning Curve.
Parham Santana was brought in by Learning Curves manage-
ment to create a more muscular brand for the company. The
design firm felt that its client deserved the cachet of being the
expert in their field, and the firm set out to proclaim it graphically.
We were very impressed with the care and profess
ionalism that
they put into the development of their products, explains John
Parham, principal of the brand strategy and design firm. We felt
the most efficient and effective way to expr
ess this was a seal of
approval that celebrates the childs achievements and stands out
so moms can track the products on the shelf and go on to new
products as the child grows.”
Learning Curve CEO John Lee had brought an entir
e range of
developmental toy brands, including Thomas and Friends,
Lamaze, Felt Kids, Madeline, and Eden, under the umbrella of his
company to cover the 0- to 12-year
-old market. But making retail-
ers and consumers aware of Learning Curve while maintaining
the sub-brand integrity of its products was a challenge. Before
Parham Santana began work on the proj
ect, Learning Curve Inter-
national realized that it owned significant shelf presence, though
its name remained r
elatively unknown to consumers.
Parham Santana
Learning Curve
Corporate Identity Redesign
The new Learning Curve identity mark is housed in what looks
like a quality seal. The new identity has a celebratory feel, laud
-
ing the brand as well as the achievements of the children who
play with the companys toys.
“We felt the most efficient and
effective way to express this was
a seal of approval that celebrates
the child’s achievements.”
Learning Curves original logo felt cold and seemed more appro-
priate for a bank or mutual fund. However, Parham Santanas
designers felt it was important to keep some aspect of the old
mark’s ascending curve in the new mark.
63

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required