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Mac OS® X Snow Leopard™ Bible by Mark Hattersley, Galen Gruman

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Chapter 10. Connecting to the Web

The World Wide Web — known as the Web for short — has transformed society. The Web was created in the 1990s as a way to use the Internet — a global network originally created so military commands and other government entities could communicate in the aftermath of a nuclear war — for researchers and others to communicate more richly than just via the exchange of text messages. Quickly, the Web became widely used for other purposes, such as transmitting e-mail, transferring files, and providing real-time chat. Scientists at the European Center for Nuclear Research (known by its French acronym CERN) created a language that let people create pages with text, images, and hyperlinks to other pages and resources. The Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) language to create these pages and the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) to connect users to these pages became the basis for the Web we know today.

To access Web pages, you use something called a Web browser, the first popular version of which was invented at the University of Illinois at Champaign and called Mosaic. It evolved into the popular Netscape Navigator browser, which later became the ...

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