O'Reilly logo

Microsoft® Office Access™ 2007 Plain & Simple by Curtis D. Frye

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Linking to a Table in Another Access Database

When you first start using Access, it can be tempting to store all of your data about everything in a single database. The names and addresses of sales contacts could live beside the list of product categories, but they really shouldn’t. It’s better to create separate databases to store data on specific subjects, such as products or sales leads. If you do need to use data from one database in another database, you can do so. For example, if you track active customers in your orders database, you can use the same table in your sales contacts database. Access enables you to create links to tables in other databases. Linking to another table means that every change made to the table in the original database, ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required