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Microsoft Windows Vista, Second Edition: Visual QuickStart Guide by Chris Fehily

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Chapter 5. Organizing Files and Folders

Like all modern operating systems, Windows uses files and folders to organize your information so that you aren’t overwhelmed by long file lists and can distinguish one set of information from another. A file is the basic unit of computer storage; it can be a program, a program’s configuration data, a log that the computer itself maintains, or a document that you create or receive. You organize files in containers called folders (or directories), which can hold additional folders (called subfolders) to form a treelike hierarchy. Folders in turn are stored on disks, or volumes—such as hard drives, floppy disks, CDs, DVDs, USB flash drives, and network servers.

Windows creates a few system folders to store ...

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