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Mind Mapping For Dummies by Tony Buzan, Florian Rustler

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Branches – it’s all connected

Figure 3-1 contains an example of a Mind Map and presents a typical structure.

What are the differences between a Mind Map and an ordinary drawing? Some differences are immediately apparent. Unlike the traditional way of presenting information in writing, for example on this page, a Mind Map doesn’t start at the top left and end at the bottom right. A Mind Map always begins in the middle of your page or screen with the so-called central idea. The central idea contains the topic of the Mind Map and is rather like the title of a book. All further information in a Mind Map is connected to the central idea in the form of branches. You develop your Mind Map on plain paper so you’re not constrained by lines. Ideally position your paper sideways (landscape), to provide greater wider vision and space for being creative.

Main and secondary branches

Two kinds of branches can be distinguished:

check.png Main branches: These are connected directly to the central idea and contain the principal themes of a Mind Map. The main branches are rather like the chapters of a book.

check.png Sub-branches: These connect to the main branches on as many layers as you like and contain the subsidiary and detailed information of the Mind Map.

In a Mind Map each and every piece of information is written ...

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