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MoCap for Artists

Book Description

Make motion capture part of your graphics and effects arsenal. This introduction to motion capture principles and techniques delivers a working understanding of today's state-of-the-art systems and workflows without the arcane pseudocodes and equations. Learn about the alternative systems, how they have evolved, and how they are typically used, as well as tried-and-true workflows that you can put to work for optimal effect. Demo files and tutorials provided on the companion CD deliver first-hand experience with some of the core processes.

Table of Contents

  1. Front Cover
  2. Half Title
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright
  5. Contents
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. Introduction
  8. Chapter 1: An Overview and History of Motion Capture
    1. 1.1 About This Book
    2. 1.2 History of Mocap
      1. 1.2.1 Early attempts
      2. 1.2.2 Rotoscoping
      3. 1.2.3 Beginning of digital mocap
    3. 1.3 Types of Mocap
      1. 1.3.1 Optical mocap systems
      2. 1.3.2 Magnetic mocap systems
      3. 1.3.3 Mechanical mocap systems
  9. Chapter 2: Preproduction
    1. 2.1 Importance of Preproduction
    2. 2.2 Pre-capture Planning
      1. 2.2.1 Script
      2. 2.2.2 Storyboard
      3. 2.2.3 Shot list
      4. 2.2.4 Animatic
    3. 2.3 Preparation for Capture
      1. 2.3.1 Talent
      2. 2.3.2 Marker sets
        1. 2.3.2.1 What are the system limitations?
        2. 2.3.2.2 What kind of motion will be captured?
        3. 2.3.2.3 Know the anatomy
      3. 2.3.3 Capture volume
      4. 2.3.4 Shot list
      5. 2.3.5 Capture schedule
      6. 2.3.6 Rehearsals
      7. 2.3.7 Props
      8. 2.3.8 Suits and markers
  10. Chapter 3: Pipeline
    1. 3.1 Setting up a Skeleton for a 3D Character
    2. 3.2 Calibrations
      1. 3.2.1 System calibration
      2. 3.2.2 Subject calibration
    3. 3.3 Capture Sessions
      1. 3.3.1 Audio and video references
      2. 3.3.2 Organization
      3. 3.3.3 Preventing occlusions
    4. 3.4 Cleaning Data
    5. 3.5 Editing Data
    6. 3.6 Applying Motions to a 3D Character
    7. 3.7 Rendering and Post-production
  11. Chapter 4: Cleaning and Editing Data
    1. 4.1 Cleaning Marker Data
      1. 4.1.1 Types of data
        1. 4.1.1.1 Optical marker data (translational data)
        2. 4.1.1.2 Translational and rotational data
        3. 4.1.1.3 Skeletal data
      2. 4.1.2 What to clean and what not?
        1. 4.1.2.1 What not to clean?
        2. 4.1.2.2 What to clean?
      3. 4.1.3 Labeling/identifying
      4. 4.1.4 Data cleaning methods
        1. 4.1.4.1 Eliminating gaps
        2. 4.1.4.2 Eliminating spikes
        3. 4.1.4.3 Rigid body
        4. 4.1.4.4 Filters
      5. 4.1.5 When to stop?
    2. 4.2 Applying Marker Data to the Skeleton
      1. 4.2.1 Actor
      2. 4.2.2 Skeleton
      3. 4.2.3 Character
  12. Chapter 5: Skeletal Editing
    1. 5.1 Retargeting
      1. 5.1.1 Reducing need for retargeting
      2. 5.1.2 Scaling a skeleton
      3. 5.1.3 Fixing foot sliding
      4. 5.1.4 Working on the spine
    2. 5.2 Blending Motions
      1. 5.2.1 Selecting a blending point
      2. 5.2.2 Matching positions
      3. 5.2.3 Dealing with less than ideal cases
    3. 5.3 Inverse Kinematics
    4. 5.4 Floor Contact
    5. 5.5 Rigid Body
    6. 5.6 Looping Motion
      1. 5.6.1 Getting motion ready
    7. 5.6.2 Setting up the loop
      1. 5.6.2.1 Walking down the z-axis
      2. 5.6.2.2 Taking out the translation
    8. 5.7 Poses
      1. 5.7.1 Deciding what to use
      2. 5.7.2 Creating a pose
      3. 5.7.3 Key-framing a pose
  13. Chapter 6: Data Application – Intro Level: Props
    1. 6.1 A Stick with Two Markers
      1. 6.1.1 When it fails: Occlusion
      2. 6.1.2 When it fails: Rotation
    2. 6.2 A Stick with Three Markers
      1. 6.2.1 Three markers with equal distances
      2. 6.2.2 Three markers on a single straight line
      3. 6.2.3 Placement of three markers that works
    3. 6.3 Flexible Objects
  14. Chapter 7: Data Application – Intermediate Level: Decomposing and Composing Motions
    1. 7.1 Mapping Multiple Motions
      1. 7.1.1 Decomposing and composing upper and lower body motions
      2. 7.1.2 Synchronizing upper and lower body motions
    2. 7.2 Balance
    3. 7.3 Breaking Motion Apart
      1. 7.3.1 When you don’t need all the motion
      2. 7.3.2 Re-use of motion data for non-motion purposes
  15. Chapter 8: Data Application – Advanced Level: Integrating Data with Character Rigs
    1. 8.1 Mocap as Forward Kinematics Animation
    2. 8.2 Key-frame Animation with Inverse Kinematics
      1. 8.2.1 Key-framing
      2. 8.2.2 IK
    3. 8.3 Integrating Mocap Animation and Key-frame Animation
      1. 8.3.1 Why do we want to do that?
      2. 8.3.2 Setting up a skeleton for FK and IK
      3. 8.3.3 Adding key-frame animation to mocap
  16. Chapter 9: Hand Motion Capture
    1. 9.1 Anatomy of a Hand
    2. 9.2 Rig and Marker Set for the Hand
      1. 9.2.1 Rigid hand
      2. 9.2.2 Mitten
      3. 9.2.3 Mitten with an independent thumb
      4. 9.2.4 Mitten that stretches
      5. 9.2.5 Ultimate
    3. 9.3 Capturing Hands
  17. Chapter 10: Facial Motion Capture
    1. 10.1 Anatomy of a Face
    2. 10.2 Camera Setup and Capture
    3. 10.3 Facial Rig
      1. 10.3.1 Facial rig with discrete joints
      2. 10.3.2 Facial rig with muscles
      3. 10.3.3 Facial rig with IK
    4. 10.4 Marker Set
    5. 10.5 Facial Data Stabilization
    6. 10.6 Facial Data Editing
  18. Chapter 11: Puppetry Capture
    1. 11.1 Background
    2. 11.2 Benefits
    3. 11.3 Ideas/Inspiration
    4. 11.4 Performance
    5. 11.5 Projects
    6. 11.6 Methods
    7. 11.7 Real Time
  19. Chapter 12: Mocap Data and Math
    1. 12.1 How Data Is Created
      1. 12.1.1 Optical systems
      2. 12.1.2 Magnetic systems
      3. 12.1.3 Mechanical systems
    2. 12.2 Data Types and Formats
      1. 12.2.1 C3D
      2. 12.2.2 ASF/AMC
      3. 12.2.3 BVH
      4. 12.2.4 FBX
    3. 12.3 Coordinates and Coordinate Systems
      1. 12.3.1 2D and 3D coordinate systems
      2. 12.3.2 Cartesian, spherical, and cylindrical coordinate systems
      3. 12.3.3 Right-handed and left-handed systems
      4. 12.3.4 Object space and world space
    4. 12.4 Order of Transformation
    5. 12.5 Euler Angle
    6. 12.6 Gimbal Lock
    7. 12.7 Quaternions
  20. Bibliography
  21. Appendix A: Shot List for Juggling Cow
  22. Appendix B: Sample Mocap Production Pipeline and Data Flow Chart
  23. Glossary
  24. Index