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Model-Based System Architecture

Book Description

Presents modeling approaches that can be performed in SysML and other modeling languages

This book combines the emerging discipline of systems architecting with model-based approaches using SysML. The early chapters of the book provide the fundamentals of systems architecting; discussing what systems architecting entails and how it benefits systems engineering. Model-based systems engineering is then defined, and its capabilities to develop complex systems on time and in a feasible quality are discussed. The remainder of the book covers important topics such as: architecture descriptions; architecture patterns; perspectives, viewpoints, views and their relation to system architecture; the roles of a system architect, their team, and stakeholders; systems architecting processes; agile approaches to systems architecting; variant modeling techniques; architecture frameworks; and architecture assessment. The book's organization allows experts to read the chapters out of sequence. Novices can read the chapters sequentially to gain a systematic introduction to system architecting.

Model-Based System Architecture

  • Provides comprehensive coverage of the Functional Architecture for Systems (FAS) method created by the authors and based on common MBSE practices
  • Covers architecture frameworks, including the System of Systems, Zachman Frameworks, TOGAF®, and more
  • Includes a consistent example system, the “Virtual Museum Tour” system, that allows the authors to demonstrate the systems architecting concepts covered in the book

Model-Based System Architecture is a comprehensive reference for system architects and systems engineers in technology companies. This book will also serve as a reference to students and researchers interested in functional architectures. 

Tim Weilkiens is the CEO at the German consultancy oose Innovative Informatik and co-author of the SysML specification. He has introduced model-based systems engineering to a variety of industry sectors.  He is author of several books about modeling and the MBSE methodology SYSMOD.

Jesko G. Lamm is a Senior Systems Engineer at Bernafon, a Swiss manufacturer for hearing instruments. With Tim Weilkiens, Jesko G. Lamm founded the Functional Architectures working group of the German chapter of INCOSE.

Stephan Roth is a coach, consultant, and trainer for systems and software engineering at the German consultancy oose Innovative Informatik. He is a state-certified technical assistant for computer science from Physikalisch-Technische Lehranstalt (PTL) Wedel and a certified systems engineer (GfSE)®- Level C.

Markus Walker works at Schindler Elevator in the research and development division as elevator system architect. He is an INCOSE Certified Systems Engineering Professional (CSEP) and is engaged in the committee of the Swiss chapter of INCOSE.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Wiley Series in Systems Engineering and Management
  4. Copyright
  5. Foreword
  6. Preface
  7. About the Companion Website
  8. Chapter 1: Introduction
  9. Chapter 2: An Example: The Virtual Museum Tour System
  10. Chapter 3: Better Products — The Value of Systems Architecting
    1. 3.1 The Share of Systems Architecting in Making Better Products
    2. 3.2 The Benefits that can be Achieved
    3. 3.3 The Benefits that can be Communicated Inside the Organization
    4. 3.4 The Beneficial Elements of Systems Architecting
    5. 3.5 Benefits of Model-Based Systems Architecting
  11. Chapter 4: Definition of System Architecture
    1. 4.1 What is Architecture? – Discussion of Some Existing Definitions
    2. 4.2 Modeling the Definitions of “System” and “System Architecture”
  12. Chapter 5: Model-Based System Architecture
  13. Chapter 6: Architecture Description
    1. 6.1 Why Spending Effort to Describe the Architecture?
    2. 6.2 The Architecture Description
    3. 6.3 How to Get an Architecture Description?
  14. Chapter 7: Architecture Patterns and Principles
    1. 7.1 The SYSMOD Zigzag Pattern
    2. 7.2 The Base Architecture
    3. 7.3 Cohesion and Coupling
    4. 7.4 Separation of Definition, Usage and Run-Time
    5. 7.5 Separate Stable from unstable parts
    6. 7.6 The Ideal System
    7. 7.7 View and Model
    8. 7.8 Diagram Layout
    9. 7.9 System Model Structure
    10. 7.10 Heuristics
  15. Chapter 8: Requirements and Use Case Analysis
    1. 8.1 Identify and Define Requirements
    2. 8.2 Specify The System Context
    3. 8.3 Identify Use Cases
    4. 8.4 Describe Use Case Flows
    5. 8.5 Model the Domain Knowledge
  16. Chapter 9: Perspectives, Viewpoints and Views in System Architecture*
    1. 9.1 Overview
    2. 9.2 The Functional Perspective
    3. 9.3 The Physical Perspective
    4. 9.4 The Behavioral Perspective
    5. 9.5 The Layered Perspective
    6. 9.6 System Deployment Perspective
    7. 9.7 Other Perspectives
    8. 9.8 Relation to the System Context
    9. 9.9 Mapping Different Perspectives and Levels
    10. 9.10 Traceability
    11. 9.11 Perspectives and Views in Model-Based Systems Architecting
  17. Chapter 10: Typical Architecture Stakeholders
    1. 10.1 Overview
    2. 10.2 Requirements Engineering
    3. 10.3 Verification
    4. 10.4 Configuration Management
    5. 10.5 Engineering Disciplines
    6. 10.6 Project and Product Management
    7. 10.7 Development Roadmap Planners
    8. 10.8 Production and Distribution
    9. 10.9 Suppliers
    10. 10.10 Marketing and Brand Management
    11. 10.11 Management
  18. Chapter 11: Roles
    1. 11.1 Roles
    2. 11.2 The System Architect Role
    3. 11.3 System Architecture Teams
    4. 11.4 System Architecture Stakeholders
    5. 11.5 Recruiting System Architecture People
    6. 11.6 Talent Development for System Architects
  19. Chapter 12: Processes
    1. 12.1 The Systems Architecting Processes
    2. 12.2 Change and Configuration Management Processes
    3. 12.3 Other Processes Involving the System Architect
  20. Chapter 13: Agile Approaches
    1. 13.1 The History of Iterative-Incremental and Agile Development
    2. 13.2 System Architects in an Agile Environment
  21. Chapter 14: The FAS Method
    1. 14.1 Motivation
    2. 14.2 Functional Architectures for Systems
    3. 14.3 The FAS Method
    4. 14.4 FAS Heuristics
    5. 14.5 FAS with SysML
    6. 14.6 Modeling Tool Support
    7. 14.7 Mapping of a Functional Architecture to a Physical Architecture
    8. 14.8 Experiences with the FAS Method
    9. 14.9 FAS Workshops
    10. 14.10 Nonfunctional Requirements and the Functional Architecture
    11. 14.11 Completeness of the Functional Architecture
    12. 14.12 Functional Architectures and the Zigzag Pattern
  22. Chapter 15: Product Lines & Variants
    1. 15.1 Definitions Variant Modeling
    2. 15.2 Variant Modeling with SML
    3. 15.3 Other Variant Modeling Techniques
  23. Chapter 16: Architecture Frameworks
    1. 16.1 Enterprise Architectures
    2. 16.2 System of Systems (SS)
    3. 16.3 An overview Of Architecture Frameworks
    4. 16.4 The UPDM standard
    5. 16.5 What to do when we come in touch with architecture frameworks
    6. 16.6 Conclusion
  24. Chapter 17: Cross-Cutting Concerns
    1. 17.1 The Game-Winning Nonfunctional Aspects
    2. 17.2 Human System Interaction and Human Factors Engineering
    3. 17.3 Risk Management
    4. 17.4 Trade Studies
    5. 17.5 Budgets
  25. Chapter 18: Architecture Assessment
  26. Chapter 19: Making It Work in the Organization
    1. 19.1 Overview
    2. 19.2 Organizational Structure for Systems Architecting
    3. 19.3 Recipes from the Authors' Experience
  27. Chapter 20: Soft Skills
    1. 20.1 It's All about Communication
    2. 20.2 Personality Types
    3. 20.3 Intercultural Collaboration Skills
  28. Chapter 21: Outlook: The World after Product Line Engineering
  29. Appendix A: OMG SysML
    1. A.1 Diagram and Model
    2. A.2 Structure Diagrams
    3. A.3 Behavior Diagrams
    4. A.4 Requirements Diagram
    5. A.5 Extension of SysML with Profiles
    6. A.6 Architecture of the Language
  30. Appendix B: The V-Model
    1. B.1 A Brief History of the V-Model or the Systems Engineering Vee
    2. B.2 A Handy Illustration but No Comprehensive Process Description
    3. B.3 Critical Considerations
    4. B.4 Reading Instruction for a Modern Systems Engineering Vee
  31. Bibliography
  32. Index
  33. Wiley Series in Systems Engineering and Management
  34. End User License Agreement