Appendix B: Glossary

10Base2: A type of coax cable that was once the most often used cable for Ethernet networks; also known as thinnet or cheapernet. The maximum length of a single segment is 185 meters (600 feet). 10base2 is now all but obsolete.

10Base5: The original Ethernet coax cable, now pretty much obsolete; also known as yellow cable or thick cable. The maximum length of a single segment is 500 meters (1,640 feet).

10BaseT: Twisted-pair cable, commonly used for Ethernet networks; also known as UTP, twisted pair, or twisted sister (just kidding!). The maximum length of a single segment is 100 meters (330 feet). Of the three Ethernet cable types, this one is the easiest to work with.

100BaseFX: The Ethernet standard for high-speed fiber-optic connections.

100BaseT4: An alternative standard for 100 Mbps Ethernet using four-pair Category-3 cable.

100BaseTX: The leading standard for 100 Mbps Ethernet, which uses two-pair, Category-5 twisted-pair cable.

100VG AnyLAN: A standard for 100 Mbps Ethernet that isn’t as popular as 100BaseT. Like 100BaseT, 100VG AnyLAN uses twisted-pair cable.

1000BaseT: A new standard for 1,000 Mbps Ethernet using four-pair, Category-5, unshielded twisted-pair cable. 1000BaseT is also known as Gigabit Ethernet.

1000000000000BaseT: Well, not really. But if current trends continue, we’ll get there soon.

802.2: The forgotten IEEE standard. The more glamorous 802.3 standard relies on 802.2 for moral support.

802.3: The IEEE standard known in the vernacular ...

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